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After some experimentation, I've ended up with the following code, trying to replicate the C# await functionality:

var promise = new WinJS.Promise(MyFunc())
    .then(function () {
        // Second function which uses data set-up in the first
        MyFunc2();
    });

'MyFunc()' executes correctly, but 'MyFunc2()' does not, and the program crashes. What am I misunderstanding about the Promise object?

(This is using Windows 8)

EDIT:

The full code for MyFunc() is now as follows:

function MyFunc() {
    var foldername = "Folder";
    var filename = "readme.xml";

    var promise = Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.current.installedLocation.getFolderAsync(foldername).then(function (folder) {
        folder.getFileAsync(filename).then(function (file) {
            var loadSettings = new Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlLoadSettings;
            loadSettings.prohibitDtd = false;
            loadSettings.resolveExternals = false;
            Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlDocument.loadFromFileAsync(file, loadSettings).then(function (doc) {
                dataText = doc.getXml();
                xmlDoc = doc;
            }, function (error) {
                output.value = "Error: Unable to load XML file";
                output.style.color = "red";
            }, function (error) {
                output.value = "Error: Unable to load XML file";
                output.style.color = "red";
            })
        })
    });

    return promise;
};

The result now is that 'MyFunc2()' executes before 'MyFunc()' completes. `MyFunc2() uses the global variable xmlDoc, which is therefore undefined at that time.

share|improve this question
    
Does MyFunc actually return the data you need? Or does it just set some global variables that need to be used in the function that comes after? –  Paul O. Jan 9 '13 at 15:40
    
Just sets some global variables –  pm_2 Jan 9 '13 at 16:44
    
possible duplicate of Wait until promise and nested thens are complete –  Raymond Chen Jan 9 '13 at 19:03
    
The parameter to new WinJS.Promise is not a promise. It's a promise-generator. Since you already have a promise, just use it directly. var promise = MyFunc().then(...). –  Raymond Chen Jan 28 '13 at 20:14
    
I don't understand why this is not what I'm already doing –  pm_2 Feb 5 '13 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should chain all the promises together and then wait on the final promise.

function MyFunc() {
    var promise = Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.current.installedLocation.getFolderAsync(foldername).then(function (folder) {
        return folder.getFileAsync(filename);
        }).done(function (file) {
            var loadSettings = new Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlLoadSettings;
            loadSettings.prohibitDtd = false;
            loadSettings.resolveExternals = false;
            return Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlDocument.loadFromFileAsync(file, loadSettings);
        }).then(function (doc) {
            dataText = doc.getXml();
            xmlDoc = doc;
            return doc; // whatever the result is
        }, function (error) {
            output.value = "Error: Unable to load XML file";
            output.style.color = "red";
        });
    return promise;
}

Then you can chain on the promise returned by MyFunc:

var promise = MyFunc().then(function(doc) { MyFunc2(...); });
share|improve this answer
    
I've edited my post to show the full code as it is now, although this still doesn't work. –  pm_2 Jan 10 '13 at 8:11
1  
This is sorted. Your suggestion did work, however - you've got the done and then reversed. –  pm_2 Feb 14 '13 at 21:28

All right, given the edit, you will have to use a slightly different approach. You will need to make MyFunc() actually return the promise variable you are creating. This will allow you to chain MyFunc to MyFunc2. So you would do something like this:

var promise = Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.current.installedLocation.getFolderAsync(foldername).then(function (folder) {
        folder.getFileAsync(filename).done(function (file) {
            var loadSettings = new Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlLoadSettings;
            loadSettings.prohibitDtd = false;
            loadSettings.resolveExternals = false;
            Windows.Data.Xml.Dom.XmlDocument.loadFromFileAsync(file, loadSettings).then(function (doc) {
                dataText = doc.getXml();
                xmlDoc = doc;
            }, function (error) {
                output.value = "Error: Unable to load XML file";
                output.style.color = "red";
            });
...
return promise;

Assuming that's the only promise in MyFunc(). If not, you can either chain all the promises together, or put them all in an array and return, for example, WinJS.Promise.join(promiseArray).

Now that you are returning a promise from MyFunc(), you can use then to chain it.

var promise = MyFunc().then(function () {
    // Second function which uses data set-up in the first
    MyFunc2();
});

If MyFunc2 also contains async code, you could return those promises as well, and keep chaining as long as you needed to.

var promise = MyFunc().then(function () {
    // Second function which uses data set-up in the first
    return MyFunc2();
}).then(function () {
    //And on and on...
});
share|improve this answer
    
See latest edit - MyFunc() does indeed contain asynchronous code. Both of the approaches that you've suggested stop it crashing, but the second function begins before the first completes. –  pm_2 Jan 9 '13 at 17:35
    
All right, I have modified my answer in light of the new information. –  Paul O. Jan 9 '13 at 17:46
    
This still doesn't work. Although it doesn't in MyFunc(), the code for MyFuncs2() is executes before it finishes. –  pm_2 Jan 10 '13 at 8:10

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