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I am attempting to implement an auto-formatter in JS, such that if I have a given value (e.g. 12345678) and I have a given format (e.g. XX.XX.XX OR XX-XX-XX OR XX/XX/XX OR XXX-XXXX), I can auto-format my initial value to any of the given formats.

The required format will vary, so it needs to be able to take any given format and reformat the original value to match.

I have no idea if its possible or how to go about it. Any help appreciated.

Thanks,

Clara

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3  
What makes you think a regex could be useful ? And please precise what would be the results with the format you give. –  dystroy Jan 9 '13 at 8:45
    
thanks guys, in the end I went with dystroy's solution because that is what I used to implement the requirement this time. Macek's version will come in handy soon enough, so thank you also macek. –  clara cruz Jan 9 '13 at 23:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this ?

function format(mask, number) {
   var s = ''+number, r = '';
   for (var im=0, is = 0; im<mask.length && is<s.length; im++) {
     r += mask.charAt(im)=='X' ? s.charAt(is++) : mask.charAt(im);
   }
   return r;
}    

console.log(format('XX.XX.XX', 12345678)); // logs "12.34.56" 
console.log(format('XXX-XXXX', 12345678)); // logs "123-4567"
console.log(format('XX-XX-XX', 12345678)); // logs "12-34-56 "
console.log(format('XX/XX/XX', 12345678)); // logs "12/34/56"
console.log(format('XX/XX/XX/XX/XX', 12345678)); // logs "12/34/56/78"

No regex engine was harmed in the making of this code.

Fiddle

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1  
You may want to mention that array-like access to strings (string[x]) doesn't work on older browsers. .charAt() is a alternative. –  Cerbrus Jan 9 '13 at 9:08
    
@Cerbrus You're right. Edited for better compatibility. –  dystroy Jan 9 '13 at 9:10

This should work for you

var value = '12345678';

// 12345678 => 12.34.56.78
console.log(value.replace(/(\d{2})(?=\d)/g, '$1.'));

// 12345678 => 12/34/56/78
console.log(value.replace(/(\d{2})(?=\d)/g, '$1/'));

// 12345678 => 12-34-56-78
console.log(value.replace(/(\d{2})(?=\d)/g, '$1-'));

// 12345678 => 1234-5678
console.log(value.replace(/(\d{4})(?=\d)/g, '$1-'));

// a more complex format (create US phone number)
// 1234567890 => +1 (123)-456-7890
console.log('1234567890'.replace(/^(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})$/g, '+1 ($1)-$2-$3'));
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You can build a regex from a format, automatically, like this:

var format = 'XX-XX-XX';
var string = '111111';
var regex = '';

for(var i = 1; format.indexOf('X') >= 0; i++){
    format = format.replace('X', '$'+i);
    regex += '(\\d)'; // to match a digit enclosed in ()
}

Or as a function:

function format(string, format){
    var regex = '';

    for(var i = 1; format.indexOf('X') >= 0; ++i){
        format = format.replace('X', '$'+i);
        regex += '(\\d)';
    }
    regex += '[^]*'; // Match the rest of the string to crop characters overflowing the format.
// Remove this ^ line if you want `format('12345678', 'XX/XX/XX')` to return `12/34/5678` instead of `12/34/56`;
    return string.replace(new RegExp(regex), format);
}


console.log(format('111111', 'XX-XX-XX'));  // 11-11-11
console.log(format('111111', 'XX.XX.XX'));  // 11.11.11 
console.log(format('1111111', 'XXX-XXXX')); // 111-1111
console.log(format('111111', 'XX-XX-XX'));  // 11-11-11
console.log(format('111111', 'XX/XX/XX'));  // 11/11/11
console.log(format('123456789', 'XX/XX/XX'));  // 12/34/56 (789 are cropped off.)
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format('12345678', 'XX/XX/XX') gives 12/34/5678. Is that intended ? –  dystroy Jan 9 '13 at 9:09
    
Not really, but it's an easy fix, editing. Edit: done. –  Cerbrus Jan 9 '13 at 9:10

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