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I'm looking for a term descibing the Type that would replace in an explicit implementation of a generic method.

My scenario goes something like this:

I'm happily pair programming with a dude by the name of Kent. Kent writes a explicit implementation of the generic method in question and I want to tell him he's doing it wrong.

public void Foo<______> (______ buzz) 
{
    buzz.Bar();
}

So I say: " Hey Kent, you should change that _ to MyClass"

Could someone please help me replace this __ with something a bit smarter sounding? Maybe a "TargetType", "ExplicitType", or "thingamagig"?

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2  
generic parameter. –  TomTom Jan 9 '13 at 9:43
    
Why the downvote? –  Default Jan 9 '13 at 9:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The term is "generic type parameter".

In a generic type or method definition, a type parameters is a placeholder for a specific type that a client specifies when they instantiate a variable of the generic type.

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It is a "generic type parameter". From the MSDN introduction to C# generics:

What Are Generics

Generics allow you to define type-safe classes without compromising type safety, performance, or productivity. You implement the server only once as a generic server, while at the same time you can declare and use it with any type. To do that, use the < and > brackets, enclosing a generic type parameter.

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It calls Generic Type Parameters

A Generic type parameters is a placeholder for a specific type that a client specifies when they instantiate a variable of the generic type.

Generics in .NET let you reuse code and the effort you put into implementing it.

public void Foo<T> (T buzz) 
{
    buzz.Bar();
}

In the above example a generic Foo of Type "T", where the T is provided by the caller.

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