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I'm a C beginner, today I encountered a problem that puzzled me for hours and I subtracted the clauses where the problem occurs.

I compiled it with Archlinux(gcc).

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main()
{
    char s[SIZE]; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; )
        s[i++] = 'm';
    s[i++] = '\n';
    s[i] = '\0';
    printf("%s/D\n", s, i);

    return 0;
}

It worked without errors.

The output is mmmmmmmmmm 11.

With one line removed. s[i++] = '\n';

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main()
{
    char s[SIZE]; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; )
        s[i++] = 'm';
    s[i] = '\0';
    printf("%s %d\n", s, i);

    return 0;
}

The "i" became 0. The output: mmmmmmmmmm 0

but once compiled with Cent OS(gcc).

The "i" didn't become 0.

back to Archlinux. I entered another line. int a = i", to reference i;

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main()
{
    char s[SIZE]; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; )
        s[i++] = 'm';
    s[i] = '\0';
    int a = i;
    printf("%s/D\n", s, i);

    return 0;
}

And this time "i" didn't become 0.

I'm a newbie, someone please tell me what was happening?

If this is just some stupid mistake I made, please let me know and I'll delete the post.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
s[9] = 'm'; s[10] = '\0'; –  chris Jan 9 '13 at 9:46
1  
Also, since you are new to C, please don't use side effects. Mixing increment and assignment in s[i++] = 'm'; serves you nothing and only distracts from the structure of the code. In 99% of the cases a straight for-loop such as for (sized_t i = 0; i < SIZE; ++i) will be good enough: have the variable local to the loop, use an unsigned integer type, increment in the third part of the for. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 9 '13 at 10:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

C arrays are zero-based so valid indices in your example are [0..SIZE-1]. At the end of your loop, i==SIZE. You then write to s[SIZE] which is one element beyond the end of your array. This has undefined consequences.

In your test, &s[SIZE] == &i so you write to i in both cases. In the first case, the ascii value of '\n' happens to be what you expected for i so you don't notice the bug. In the second case you get luckier, reset i to 0 and spot the array overflow.

The fix is to exit your loop one iteration sooner, leaving space for the null terminator in your char array

for (i = 0; i < SIZE-1; )
//                  ^^
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, Simonc. –  user1960581 Jan 9 '13 at 11:01

There is not enought space for ending '\0'

Change

for (i = 0; i < SIZE; )

to

for (i = 0; i < SIZE - 1; )
share|improve this answer

Here theSize of your array is defined 10 but in the end of the for loop you are trying to assign at 11th position thats why this undefined behaviour is showing up.

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 10

int main()
{
    char s[SIZE]; 
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < SIZE; )
        s[i++] = 'm';
    s[i] = '\0'; // here after end of your loop you are assigning a[10]='\0' that is makin it as undefined behaviour.
    int a = i;
    printf("%s/D\n", s, i);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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