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I'm quite new to c++ and I don't manage to make this works. Sorry but i have always worked with languages that didn't helped me to think in terms of memory pointers ans so maybe this is a fooly question.

I want to pass a float array as a default parameter. Like this:

void getHistogram(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float range[]=NULL) {

    if(range==NULL) {
        double maxPixel=0;
        minMaxLoc(src, 0, &maxPixel, 0, 0);
        range = { 0, maxPixel +1 };
    }

    // now calculate histogram with the right range
    // something something
}

I have tried with some different syntax but i'm always in front on some errors like

histogram.cpp:21: warning: extended initializer lists only available with -std=c++0x or -std=gnu++0x
histogram.cpp:21: error: cannot convert ‘<brace-enclosed initializer list>’ to ‘float*’ in assignment

EDIT (but with memory leak):

Ok, thatnks to this answer i have resolved in this way:

void imHist(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float range[]=NULL) {

    if(range==NULL) {
        double maxPixel=0;
        minMaxLoc(src, 0, &maxPixel, 0, 0);

        range = new float[2];
        range[0] = 0;
        range[1] = maxPixel +1;
    }

}

some pros or cons?

EDIT 2

see the accepted answer

share|improve this question
    
why are using float instead of default double –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 9 '13 at 11:02
2  
Try this void getHistogram(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float *range=NULL). –  flamingo Jan 9 '13 at 11:02
1  
see explanation in this answer –  Oren Jan 9 '13 at 11:03
2  
@flamingo: there is no difference between float* x and float x[] as a formal argument. why don't you try such things yourself before posting it as advice. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 9 '13 at 11:08
1  
@flamingo: there is no difference even with initialization. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jan 9 '13 at 11:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Replace your current code …

void getHistogram(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float range[]=NULL) {

    if(range==NULL) {
        double maxPixel=0;
        minMaxLoc(src, 0, &maxPixel, 0, 0);
        range = { 0, maxPixel +1 };
    }

    // now calculate histogram with the right range
    // something something
}

with this:

void getHistogram(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float range[] ) {
    assert( range != 0 );
    // now calculate histogram with the right range
    // something something
}

void getHistogram(const Mat& src, MatND& hist ) {
    double maxPixel=0;
    minMaxLoc(src, 0, &maxPixel, 0, 0);
    float range[] = { 0, maxPixel +1 };
    getHistogram( src, hist, range );
}

That said, why are you using float instead of double?


EDIT: the OP explains that the array of float is required by OpenCV.

He further explains in his answer that he's resolved the problem as follows:

void imHist(const Mat& src, MatND& hist, float range[]=NULL) {

    if(range==NULL) {
        double maxPixel=0;
        minMaxLoc(src, 0, &maxPixel, 0, 0);

        range = new float[2];
        range[0] = 0;
        range[1] = maxPixel +1;
    }
}

This leaks memory, and is needlessly inefficient.

EDIT 2: the reason that the above code leaks memory is because there is a new (which allocates memory), but no corresponding delete expression (which frees the memory), and there is no indication of whether the memory was allocated by new or provided by the caller.

The reason that it's inefficient is that a dynamic memory allocation typically is orders of magnitude slower than e.g. a basic assignment or stack allocation, because it has to do a search for a suitable small free chunk of memory.

The stack allocation (C++ “automatic memory”) avoids that inefficiency by always deallocating in reverse order of allocation, so that it can always use the start of the free stack memory area for the next allocation (modulo direction: in practice the stack grows downward in memory on all machines I have known about).

share|improve this answer
    
i am using float because the function calHist in OpenCV 2.4 accept float value as range –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:07
    
i have edited the question –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:12
    
ok i haven't seen the answer edits, sorry. Can you explain me why there is a memory leak? –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:43
    
very clear, thank you. –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:51

When you pass an array, you pass a pointer to the first element, not all the array. For give you a responce, could you edit your post and add the code when you call the function?

share|improve this answer
    
i've edited the question –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:11
    
Ok, so now it's working? By the way, you need at any cost an array of float, or you can choose everything you want for your implementation? –  Vargan Jan 9 '13 at 11:15
    
now it's working yes. i need an array of float.. –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:26
1  
I suggest to use the solution of Cheers and hth. - Alf, and divide the cases (Null or not), that solution avoid memory leak and is clear to read. –  Vargan Jan 9 '13 at 11:31
    
why memory leak?? –  nkint Jan 9 '13 at 11:41

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