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I'm reading the book "The C Programming Language" and there is an exercise that asked to verify that the expression getchar() != EOF is returning 1 or 0. Now the original code before i was asked to do that was:

int main()
{
    int c;
    c = getchar();

    while (c != EOF)
    {
        putchar(c);
        c = getchar();
    }  
}

So I though changing it to:

int main()

{
    int c;
    c = getchar();

    while (c != EOF)
    {
        printf("the value of EOF is: %d", c);
        printf(", and the char you typed was: ");

        putchar(c);
        c = getchar();
    }
}

And the answer in the book is:

int main()
{
  printf("Press a key\n\n");
  printf("The expression getchar() != EOF evaluates to %d\n", getchar() != EOF);
}

Could you please explain to me why my way didn't work?

share|improve this question
    
I'm surprised any of this works with no #include files. –  WhozCraig Jan 9 '13 at 12:28
    
it's all with #include <stdio.h> of course –  Nir Jan 9 '13 at 12:29
1  
The excercise ask you the value of getchar() != EOF, not the value of getchar(). –  effeffe Jan 9 '13 at 12:30
2  
Also, what exactly is this: printf("the value of EOF is: %d", c); just inside the while-loop. didn't we just test that c was NOT EOF ?? –  WhozCraig Jan 9 '13 at 12:32
    
yes, my bad. @effeffe thanks your answer helped –  Nir Jan 9 '13 at 12:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because if c is EOF, the while loop terminates (or won't even start, if it is already EOF on the first character typed). The condition for running another iteration of the loop is that c is NOT EOF.

share|improve this answer

To display the value of EOF

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
   printf("EOF on my system is %d\n", EOF);
   return 0;
}

EOF is defined in stdio.h normally as -1

share|improve this answer
**EOF can be triggered through keyboard by pressing keys ctrl+d in unix and ctrl+c in windows.**

Sample Code  :

    void main()
    {
           printf(" value of getchar() != eof is %d ",(getchar() != EOF));
            printf("value of eof %d", EOF);

    }

output:
[root@aricent prac]# ./a.out 
a
 value of  getchar() != eof is 1 value of eof -1
[root@aricent prac]# ./a.out 
Press    ctrl+d
 value of   getchar() !=  eof is 0 value of eof -1[root@aricent prac]# 
share|improve this answer

in your program you are reading character from std input as c = getchar();

this way you can get ascii value of key pressed, Which will never be equal to EOF.

because EOF is End of File.

better you try to open any existing file and read from the file, so when it reached End Of File(EOF), it will quit the while loop.

well the answer in the book is:

int main()
{
  printf("Press a key\n\n");
  printf("The expression getchar() != EOF evaluates to %d\n", getchar() != EOF);
}

try to understand the program, it gets a key, which will not be equal to EOF so it should always print "The expression getchar() != EOF evaluates to 0".

hope it helps.......

share|improve this answer
1  
The standard doesn't use ASCII, but more important, getchar returns EOF in case of end of file and this value is actually saved in c, that's why we declare c as int instead of char. Therefore, the answer of the book could print both 0 or 1. Anyway, if the character is different from EOF, it should print 1, not 0. –  effeffe Jan 9 '13 at 12:51

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