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I'm new to this, just wondering if anyone could help :)

I have a file like this:

start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
end1

How do I find the string end1 and add a few lines before the string, so it looks like:

start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
NaN  
NaN  
end1

But the number of line added has to depend on a specific number, say 5. If it only has 3 entries between start1 and end1, the numbers of line added is 2.

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You can use tail -2 filename | head -1 to get the penultimate line. From there, I guess you can easily write a shell script the use the string value of that line and the value of the last line. –  Khoa Nghiem Jan 9 '13 at 12:50
    
What have you tried and where did you get stuck? –  Johnsyweb Jan 9 '13 at 13:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's really not clear whether that number you mention is always something you figure out from the file contents or something you might program but try this:

awk '
/start/ { c=0 }
/end/   { for (i=1; i<c; i++) print "NaN" }
{ print; ++c }
' file

and let us know of any problems.

EDIT: to add c lines if less than 5 lines exist:

awk '
/start/ { c=0 }
/end/ && c<5  { for (i=1; i<c; i++) print "NaN" }
{ print; ++c }
' file

or to pad up to 5 lines:

awk '
/start/ { c=0 }
/end/   { for (i=c; i<=5; i++) print "NaN" }
{ print; ++c }
' file
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Hi Ed, I'm sorry I wasn't being very clear. I need to first check the number of entries between start1 and end1. And if the number of entry is less than 5, I need to add extra lines. So I do something like count=`awk'/start1/{c=-2}{c++}/end1/{print c}' <inputfile if [ "$count" -ne 5] –  Babycece Jan 9 '13 at 13:15
    
if ["$count" -ne 5] then add"NaN" –  Babycece Jan 9 '13 at 13:22
    
Then just test the counter variable, c. I'll update my script now to show that. –  Ed Morton Jan 9 '13 at 16:45

You can easily do this with awk(1):

awk '/start1/ {start=NR} /end1/ && start {for (i=NR-start;i<=5;++i) {print "NaN"}} 1'

That will record which line the string start1 was on, and when it sees the line the string end1, it will output up to 5 lines of NaN depending on how far apart start1 and end1 are. Change the 5 to be whatever you need.

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This works fine for me, it's exactly what I'm looking for! Thanks camh :) xxx –  Babycece Jan 9 '13 at 13:33
    
nice idea to save the line number. you might want to pass the value 5 with the -v option –  glenn jackman Jan 9 '13 at 17:28
awk -vt=5 '/start1/{print;next;}/end1/{for(x=1;x<=t-i;x++)print "NaN";}++i' file

you just replace the 5 in above one-liner to get different number of "NaN" :)

EDIT: start may not at 1st line.

awk -vt=5 '/start1/{i=0;print;next;}/end1/{for(x=1;x<=t-i;x++)print "NaN";}++i' file

test

kent$  cat t
Empty lines followed




foo
foo1
start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
end1
bar
bar2

kent$  awk -vt=5 '/start1/{i=0;print;next;}/end1/{for(x=1;x<=t-i;x++)print "NaN";}++i' t
Empty lines followed




foo
foo1
start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
NaN
NaN
end1
bar
bar2
share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that start1 is on the first line, whereas the question asks only about the number of entries between start and end1, not their position in the file. –  camh Jan 9 '13 at 13:21
    
Thank you so much! It works!! :D xxx But does this depend on whether the start is on the first line? I need to actually find the the string start1... –  Babycece Jan 9 '13 at 13:28
    
@Babycece yes, I assumed that "start1" is sitting at the 1st line. add i=0; to /start1/ block should solve it, I will update the answer –  Kent Jan 9 '13 at 13:33
    
@Babycece updated with test example –  Kent Jan 9 '13 at 13:37
    
Another stupid question: how do I read from a file and output it back in the same file? :) –  Babycece Jan 9 '13 at 13:45

You can use sed to do such a thing:

`sed /end1/lineToAdd0\nlineToAdd1\netc\nend1/g < file`

I’m not sure about the \n, I don’t remember if it’s sed that interprets it a special way.

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The portable way to represent a newline in sed is an escaped <return>. –  Ed Morton Jan 9 '13 at 16:49
    
thanks for your hint! –  phaazon Jan 9 '13 at 21:32

I admit that I do not know a straightforward way to do what you want with Sed. Someone will probably post an Awk answer, which is fine, but if one does not mind the run-time cost of starting the Perl interpreter, this works, too:

perl -we 'print until eof() or ($_ = <>) =~ /^start1\s*$/; exit if eof(); print; my $i = 5; --$i, print until eof() or ($_ = <>) =~ /^end1\s*$/; --$i, print "NaN\n" until $i <= 0; print; print <>;'
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This is better suited to awk just set c to the number you require:

$ awk -vc=5 '/start/{n=0}/end/{for(i=0;i++<c+1-n;)print"NaN"}++n' file
start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
NaN
NaN
end1

$ awk -vc=8 '/start/{n=0}/end/{for(i=0;i++<c+1-n;)print"NaN"}++n' file
start1  
12.3  
13.2  
15.3  
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
end1
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r '/^start/!b;n;:a;/\nend/bb;$!{N;ba};:b;/(\n[^\n]*){5}/!s/$/\nNaN/;tb;s/(\nend[^\n]*)(.*)/\2\1/' file
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