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I postet a question regarding the same problem earlier today but since the solution to that was switching library and I now have a problem with that other library i thougt i'd open another question...hope that's fine.

So i wan't to match the following markup:

<text link="no">
    ...
</text>

I dont care what's inside text what matherrs is that text has that link attribute.

I'm now using pyparsing as follows:

def content_must_not_be_empty_string(tokens):
    if tokens[0]=="":
        raise ParseException("content cannot be empty")

text_start = Regex('<text[^<]*>')
text_no_start = Regex('<text[^<]*link="no"[^<]*>')
text_no_end = Regex('</text>[ \t\n\r\xa0]*')
text_no_content = SkipTo(text_no_start | text_no_end | text_start)
text_no_content.setParseAction(content_must_not_be_empty_string)
text_no = nestedExpr(text_no_start,text_no_end,text_no_content)
text_no.setParseAction(somemethod)

At first the whole thing looped because of empty tokens that's why I added content_must_not_be_empty.

Now it doesn't loop anymore but somemethod is not executed either.

Help would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Your sample does not show any nesting, are the <text> tags really nested, or are you just using nestedExpr to implement opening/closing of tags? –  Paul McGuire Jan 9 '13 at 13:38
    
There is a nesting inside text, it's very hard to tell how much that's why I kept it as general as possible –  pypat Jan 9 '13 at 13:57

2 Answers 2

Strictly speaking, pyparsing is not an XML parsing library, but it does include some builtin support for extracting data from XML and HTML, short of parsing the entire document. And I don't mean that you can embed regular expressions inside Regex elements. Instead, look at using makeXMLTags or makeHTMLTags:

>>> sample = """<text link="no"> lskdjflskdjf </text>"""
>>> text_start,text_end = makeXMLTags("text")
>>> text_start_no = text_start.copy().setParseAction(withAttribute(link="no"))
>>> expr1 = text_start_no + SkipTo(text_end)('body') + text_end
>>> print expr1.parseString(sample)
['text', ['link', 'no'], False, 'lskdjflskdjf ', '</text>']
>>> print expr1.parseString(sample).dump()
['text', ['link', 'no'], False, 'lskdjflskdjf ', '</text>']
- body: lskdjflskdjf 
- empty: False
- endText: </text>
- link: no
- startText: ['text', ['link', 'no'], False]
  - empty: False
  - link: no

This will get you around all kinds of unexpectedness when extracting data from XML or HTML.

Now if you actually have nested tags, then you will need to start delving into the nestedExpr area.

>>> sample2 = """<text link="no"> lskdjflskdjf<text>more</text> </text>"""

But I still encourage you to build your tag constructs using makeXMLTags or makeHTMLTags, instead of faking it with Regex.

share|improve this answer

Here's my now working piece of code:

def content_must_not_be_empty_string(tokens):
    if tokens[0]=="":
        raise ParseException("content cannot be empty")

text_no_start = Regex('<text[^<]*link="no"[^<]*>')
text_no_end = Regex('</text>[ \t\n\r\xa0]*')
text_no_content = SkipTo(text_no_start | text_no_end)
text_no_content.setParseAction(content_must_not_be_empty_string)
text_no = originalTextFor(nestedExpr(text_no_start,text_no_end,text_no_content), asString="False")
text_no.setParseAction(somemethod)
share|improve this answer
    
Please consider the non-Regex forms of your tag expressions as posted in my other answer. This code that you have is pretty fragile, subject to unexpected whitespace placement, attributes, etc. –  Paul McGuire Jan 9 '13 at 16:46
    
will do, thx for reminding me :) –  pypat Jan 14 '13 at 20:55

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