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Can somebody explain/name the priciples of SOLID development ?

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It is the set of principles you use after a code freeze on a project that uses LIQUID development principles. –  Mike Two Sep 14 '09 at 20:07
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I've always found GAS to be more Agile than LIQUID, anyway. Right now our company is undergoing a lot of SUBLIMATION training so we can transition directly from SOLID to GAS. –  Pesto Sep 14 '09 at 20:14
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@Pesto: We tried that, but all of our projects got mothballed. –  TheTXI Sep 14 '09 at 20:15
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Just to give you an example of the sort of projects the different development environments have produced: IronPython used SOLID (although Python itself contains some LIQUID), the video game flOw used LIQUID, and Valve's Steam platform used GAS. There's still some debate about whether Windows is SOLID or LIQUID. –  Pesto Sep 14 '09 at 20:29
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Ask Joel and Jeff; they're BIG fans! blog.stackoverflow.com/2009/02/podcast-41 –  Ken Keenan Sep 14 '09 at 20:46
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8 Answers

Do you have a question to one speciffic principle?

  • SRP: Single Responsibility - One reason to exist, one reason to change

  • OCP: Open Closed Principle - Open for extension, closed for modification

  • LSP: Liskov Substitution Principle - An object should be semantically replaceable for it's base class/interface

  • ISP: Interface Segregation Principle - Don't force a client to depend on an interface it doesn't need to know about

  • DIP: Dependency Inversion Principle - Depend on abstractions, not concrete detail or implementations

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What? No reference to the source? butunclebob.com/ArticleS.UncleBob.PrinciplesOfOod. –  S.Lott Sep 14 '09 at 20:12
    
Open-Closed Principle comes from Bertrand Meyer. –  Nat Sep 14 '09 at 20:16
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LSP is of course named after Barbara Liskov. –  quamrana Sep 14 '09 at 22:01
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IMHO the Open-Closed Principle is overused, most classes should simply be closed. –  starblue Sep 15 '09 at 7:09
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@starblue: The problem is that most classes are not closed to modification. Programmers keep tinkering with them. It would be marvelous if most classes really were closed, and open to extension. That would fulfill OCP. More often refactoring means occasional modifications to enable closure to further modifications. –  quamrana Sep 15 '09 at 17:36
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Here's some links that speaks more to this and has some samples:

Paraphrased from links...

S - Single responsibility - This means that a class should only do one thing. A class that does this makes it easier to change and conversly one that doesn't is much harder to maintain.

O - Open for extension, closed to modification - This means you should only change a classes behaviour by using inheritance and/or composition. It also means you should be careful in how you design your classes to be resilent to change in such a way that they won't easily break code relying on it.

L - (LSP) Derived objects should be substituable with the parent and everything should work properly. - This means that when you use a subclass in place of its parent everything should work. This may seem simple but take the classic square derived from a rectangle class and what happens if you have a parent method to set the width. This is different for a rectangle and a square.

I - (Interface segratation) Interfaces should only be forced upon those who use/need them. - Keep your interfaces small and to the point to help ensure this rule. Don't create large interfaces much like creating large classes as they start to break the Single responsibility rule.

D - (Dependency Inversion Principle) Break Dependencies. - Use interfaces instead of types when possible to help break dependencies between classes.

Definitely not the best explanation but I try... :)

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try this link for SOLID (and other principles)

http://butunclebob.com/ArticleS.UncleBob.PrinciplesOfOod

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The principles of SOLID development are stated bellow.Follow the images sequentially...

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  1. SPR(Single Responsibility Principle)

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2.OCP(Open/Closed Principle)

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3.LSP(Liskov Substitution Principle)

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4.ISP(Interface Segregation Principle)

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5.DIP(Dependency Inversion Principle)

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Omu, go with Mike Two's answer. Those are great motivational posters. Some people explain Liskov Substitution Principle with circles and ellipses, squares and rectangles, but you can't put it better than this:

"If it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, but requires batteries, then you have a wrong abstraction."

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These videos created by Stephen Bohlen will help you ... http://www.dimecasts.net/Casts/ByTag/SOLID%20Principle

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For me the best explanation (+ class diagramms + C# examples) is Design and Test Driven Development Article.

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I've just blogged about all five principles.

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