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I have a WPF Window, and in that window I have a grid.

I use M-V-VM model and I want to add a TextBox to the grid dynamically in code(in viewmodel)

How can I get access to the grid?

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Before going down this route I would ensure that it is absolutely neccessary, typically its bad practice to access the view from the view model unless there is absolutely no other alternative. –  BenjaminPaul Jan 9 '13 at 14:34
    
What @BenjaminPaul said. You don't add controls from the ViewModel when using MVVM. Use Binding to get this done. –  Ralf de Kleine Jan 9 '13 at 14:37
1  
Yes, I am aware of that, its precisely what I meant. I have however on occasion needed to gain a reference to a control within a view model to cater for controls that did not support conventional binding. Thats the scenario I was referring too. –  BenjaminPaul Jan 9 '13 at 14:39
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4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Do not use solution provided by Sanjay Patel, you are violating whole MVVM purpose and you will not be able to test that code.

Use Supervising Controller pattern.

Reading:

Example implementation for CaliburnMicro MVVM framework is shown here (will work same for all other frameworks - or you can do it by hand if you are doing MVVM by yourself):

http://drc.ideablade.com/devforce-2012/bin/view/Documentation/cocktail-tutorial-talk-to-view

Example:

1) Define interface IView in which ViewModel (VM) will talk to View with required method(s)

public interface IView 
{
    void AddTextBoxToGrid() 
}

2) Inherit code behind View from your IView and implement IView.AddTextboxToGrid() method

public partial class View : IView 
{
    public void AddTextBoxToGrid() 
    {  
        // implement here your custom view logic using standard code behind; 
    }
}

3) Add property of type IView to your VM

public class ViewModel 
{
    public IView View { get; set; }
}

4) Set View property on VM to instance of View as IView e.g. in code behind DataContext.View = this as IView; or in Caliburn you can use IScreen.OnViewAttached override method)

public partial class View : IView 
{
    public View()
    {
        // access you VM by strategy of your framework or choice - this example is when you store your VM in View's DataContext
        (DataContext as ViewModel).View = this as IView;
    } 

    public void AddTextBoxToGrid() 
    {  
        // implement here your custom view logic using standard code behind; 
    }
}

5) In your VM call IView.AddTextboxToGrid()

public class ViewModel 
{
    public IView View { get; set; }

    public void AddTextBoxToGrid() 
    {
        if (View == null) return;
        View.AddTextBoxToGrid()
    }
}
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It is better to use constructor injection to send the IVew instance to ViewModel (I mean, ViewModel class' constructor should accept an IView instance). –  MD.Unicorn Oct 2 '13 at 7:47
    
excellent answer... :) Thanks @nihique –  Phoenix Nov 28 '13 at 14:45
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You can also use the DataContext (which is the ViewModel) of the View in the code behind of the view, and add the textbox to the grid there. That would make more sense.

If you give the grid a name in your XAML file, you will be able to access the grid in the code behind immediately.

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You should move your creation code to View, and ViewModel should just notify view when it should be called.

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before going to ViewMode come up your codebehind and catch target control like that

Dont give up ViewModel in xaml instade of that use the event handler

This provides you a new Layer you can build your architecture like this MVVM => MV(C)VM

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