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I have read several articles, tutorials and blog posts about the MVVM pattern. However there is one thing I don't understand. Taking the three "layers":

  • Model
  • View
  • View Model

As far as I have understood MVVM the model contains the "raw" data, e.g. a name and address in case of a Student class. The view model exposes properties to the view which represent data of the model.

Example for a property in the view model

public string Name {
 get { return model.Name; }
 set { model.Name = value; }
}

Example for the model

private string name;

public string Name {
 get { return name; }
 set { name = value; }
}

This might sound a bit stupid but doesn't this create a redundancy? Why do I have to keep the name in the model and in the view model? Why should one not handle the name on the view model completely?

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1  
Very well put question, by the way: clear, concise and contains example code. –  JDB Jan 9 '13 at 21:02
    
Thanks a lot :-) –  Robert Jan 10 '13 at 8:25
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In such a simple example, this answer would be yes (it is unreasonably redundant). But, presumably, a page will contain more than just a single Model object. You may have the page state as well as multiple other Model objects which must all be tracked. This is done in the ViewModel.

For example, you may have additional information about the logged in user displayed in a status bar, as well as a service running to detect changes to a text file.

You may also have a form for editing the Student object. If you intend to validate those changes, then you wouldn't want to directly edit the Student object until after the modifications have been verified. The ViewModel can act as a temporary storage location in such a case.

Note on the above: It is not uncommon for validation to occur in the Model, but even then you will probably want the user to be able to enter invalid values while in the process of editing a form. For example, if your Model does not allow a zero-length value in a field, you still want to enable your user to delete the value, move to another field (say, for example, to copy it) then return to the field and finish editing (paste). If you are tied directly to the Model, then your validation logic may not handle this "in-between", "not-yet-finished" state as you'd like. For example, you might not want to accost your user with validation errors until they've finished and clicked 'Save'.

You will also probably have Command objects in the ViewModel to handle button clicks and the like. These would be domain-specific objects that would be useless in a Model.

ViewModels are also useful when you need to filter or somehow temporarily "modify" Model objects to get something useful on the screen. For example, you may want to display a list of all the Users in a system along with a real-time list of the top ten performers among them (updated every 10 seconds). Or you may want to show a list of Reports and a graph showing the overall usage rate, etc. Filtering, sorting and customizing that data would take place within the ViewModel.

The Model, on the other hand, is typically as pure as possible. Ideally, you want only POCOs that (usually) model exactly what's in your persistent storage (database, or what have you). If your persistent storage has FirstName and LastName fields, then so would your Model. Only in your ViewModel would you combine them to get a Name field (either "First Last" or "Last, First" depending on the View's needs).

For example:

namespace Model
{
    public class Student
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
    }

    public class Class
    {
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public float Score { get; set; }
    }
}

namespace ViewModel
{
    public class EditStudentRecordViewModel
    {
        private Model.Student _student;
        private IEnumerable<Model.Class> _studentClasses;

        /* Bind your View to these fields: */
        public string FullName
        {
            return _student.LastName + ", " + _student.FirstName;
        }
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        public IEnumerable<Model.Class> PassingClasses
        {
            get
            {
                return _studentClasses.Where( c => c.Score >= 78 );
            }
        }

        public IEnumerable<Model.Class> FailingClasses
        {
            get
            {
                return _studentClasses.Where( c => c.Score < 78 );
            }
        }

        public void Save()
        {
            List<string> l_validationErrors = new List<string>();
            if ( string.IsNullOrEmpty( this.FirstName ) )
                l_validationErrors.Add( "First Name must not be empty." );
            if ( string.IsNullOrEmpty( this.LastName ) )
                l_validationErrors.Add( "Last Name must not be empty." );

            if ( l_validationErrors.Any() )
                return;

            _student.FirstName = this.FirstName;
            _student.LastName = this.LastName;
            Model.Utilities.SaveStudent( _student );
        }
    }
}
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The model is the object graph that contains your business logic.

That's where you hold the behaviour (validation, calculation and such).

The ViewModel is something that models the UI and its interactions.

These are different and have different reasons for existing - the point of the pattern is to separate your display logic to the VVM (View and ViewModel) and have your business logic completely separated.

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The view model is where you would keep track of properties that are specific to the view and not necessary to the model.

Let's take your model, assume it's called Person.

And then you create a view model for Person called PersonViewModel, which looks like this:

public class PersonViewModel
{
    public Person Person { get; set; }
}

(Note, you might not want to expose the model like this directly, but that's another story)

Now let's say that you have an button in the view which is used to save the Person instance. To provide a better user experience (UX), you want to enable the button only if your model has actually changed. So you implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface on the Person class:

public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    ...

Now, you could expose a HasUnsavedChanges property from your Person which the Enabled property on the save button would bind to, but that logic has nothing to do with the person.

This is where the view model comes in. You would define this view-specific property on the view model, like so:

public class PersonViewModel
{
    public Person Person { get; set; }

    public bool HasUnsavedChanges { get; set; }
}

Then, your view model would subscribe to the PropertyChanged event of the INotifyPropertyChanged interface, and toggle the HasUnsavedChanges property on the view model.

Then, if the binding is set up correctly, the save button would enable/disable when any change happens on your model, but your model doesn't have any logic tying it to the view.

Note that you'd have to also implement INotifyPropertyChanged on the view model as well for your view to pick up when changes are made to the view model it is bound to.

Again, the point is acting as a bridge to contain the logic that is a combination of model properties and view properties that don't belong on the model.

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I've always viewed Models as the "Building Blocks" of the application. They are usually self-contained classes with some properties and perhaps some rudimentary validation or logic for its own properties only.

View Models on the other hand are my actual application classes that end up using the "building blocks" (Models) when building and running the application. They do things like perform advanced validation, process commands, handle events, any kind of business logic, etc.

It should be noted that you don't have to expose your Model's properties in your ViewModel like you have in your example code. Doing so is the "MVVM purist" approach as it completely separates your Model layer from the View layer, however it's also perfectly acceptable to expose the entire Model to the View instead. This is what I typically use in most small projects due to it's simplicity and lack of code-duplication.

public MyModel CurrentModel
{
    get { return _model; }
    set 
    {
        if (_model != value)
        {
            _model = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("CurrentModel");
        }
    }
}

However if there are cases where only a few properties from the Model is needed in the View, or if the project is large enough where I'll want to keep the layers totally separate, then I expose my Model's properties to the View through the ViewModel like you have in your example code.

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Model in MVVM is exactly the same as in MVP or Model2 MVC. It is the one part of MVC-inspired patterns that is not affected by variations on the theme.

Model is the layer which contains repositories, units of work, domain/model objects, data mappers, services and some other structures. All they combined create the model layer, which contains all of the domain business logic for the particular application.

Model is not any single instance. Anyone who tels you otherwise is full of it.

The specific usecases, for which MVVM has been designed, are situation, when you are unable to modify either the model layer or view instances, or both.

P.S. Though, if you are using ViewModel instances as per ASP.NET MVC documentation, then you actually are NOT using MVVM. It is just Model2 MVC with different names for things (where "viewmodels" are actually views and "views" are templates). They kinda messed up when they marketed Rails-like architecture as "MVC".

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