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i have a question... lets say i have the following part of code :

int *a,*a1,*a2;
for (i=1; i<=2; i++) {
    a=malloc(sizeof(int));
    if (i==1) a1=a;
    else if (i==2) a2=a;
}
*a1=5;
*a2=4;

so my question is if i use printf to print a1 and a2 the variable a1 is gonna to have the value 5 and the a2 the value 4 ? so if i use malloc to allocate memory and a points in that memory space and use again malloc to allocate memory then a points to a different part of memory but the first one part of memory still exist ? or if i use malloc with a again it will erase the first part of memory and it will write a new part of memory

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4  
You probably want == in if conditions. –  effeffe Jan 9 '13 at 14:05
1  
what was the practical use again??^^ –  Vogel612 Jan 9 '13 at 14:06
    
if u want to print 5 and 4, u have to print deferenced a1 and a2 respectively. and You have never initialized *a. Undefined behaviours. –  sr01853 Jan 9 '13 at 14:09
    
my problem is the use of malloc and not the printing of a1 and a2 ...i gave them as example –  user1809300 Jan 9 '13 at 14:11
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Each call to malloc returns a pointer to different memory, until you call free to release that memory.

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nope, the behaviour of malloc is platform-defined, how you can say that ? –  user1797612 Jan 9 '13 at 14:08
1  
@user1809300: Essentially, yes. Note that malloc does not create memory, and it does not erase memory. malloc merely manages memory. If it needs more memory, it will request it from the operating system. It maintains its own records about what memory is available. When you call malloc, it makes whatever changes it needs in its records and returns a pointer to space that is set aside just for your use. (Or, if it cannot provide the memory, it will return NULL.) It will not use that space for anything else. When you call free, it adjusts records to show that the space may be reused. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 9 '13 at 14:13
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@user1809300: malloc is portable and is defined by the C standard. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 9 '13 at 14:15
1  
@user1797612: (1) I did not say malloc works at the OS level. I said it makes requests of the operating system. (2) The standard defines behavior, not implementation. (3) malloc is specified in C 2011 7.22.3.4, in association with the surrounding clauses. –  Eric Postpischil Jan 9 '13 at 14:24
1  
@user1797612: You missed an excellent opportunity to remain silent. Please consider deleting your misguided, and misguiding, comments. –  DevSolar Jan 9 '13 at 14:39
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if i use printf to print a1 and a2 the variable a1 is gonna to have the value 5 and the a2 the value 4 ?

Erm... no.

a1 (being of type int *, i.e. pointer to integer) will contain the address resulting from the first call to malloc().

a2 (and a), being also of pointer type, will contain the address resulting from the second call to malloc().

The address in a1 will point to an integer, to which you assigned the value 5.

The address in a2 (and a) will point to an integer, to which you assigned the value 4.

Both of those integers will remain allocated until you release them by calling free() on their address. Be careful: After you called e.g. free( a2 ), the integer is no longer allocated. Calling free() again on the same address (e.g. via free( a ), or by calling free( a2 ) a second time) will result in undefined behaviour (i.e., if you are lucky, your program will crash).

A pointer is an address value. It seems this is where your confusion comes from: It isn't identical to the thing it points to.

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Are you sure about the first statement? ideone.com/XKKwgd –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 9 '13 at 14:14
1  
@shiplu.mokadd.im: Yes, I am sure about my first statement. a1 contains the address of the value, not the value itself. To get at the value (5), you have to dereference the pointer (*a1), like your linked code does in the assignment as well as the printf() statement. –  DevSolar Jan 9 '13 at 14:16
    
@shiplu.mokadd.im: Try this: printf( "a1 = %d\n", a1 );. Surprised? –  DevSolar Jan 9 '13 at 14:18
    
I know that. But I thought OP meant *a1 by a1. Its not very uncommon. +1 to you. I think this should be the correct answer than the selected one. –  shiplu.mokadd.im Jan 9 '13 at 14:28
    
@DevSolar -- IANAL, but I think passing a pointer value to printf when it expects an integer value (per %d) is UB (yes, I understand you were making a point to explain to @shiplu). –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jan 10 '13 at 17:28
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I believe the answer to your question is yes. Malloc'ing will give you a memory location with (at least) the specified size (if available). It does not free any memory, only gives you more (use free() to free malloc'ed memory).

The fact that you are using some temporary variable a has no significance. At the end of this loop a == a2 != a1

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if i use printf to print a1 and a2 the variable a1 is gonna to have the value 5 and the a2 the value 4 ?

Yes, you are correct. It is a bit strange question, though, because it is easier to try and see than to ask.

so if i use malloc to allocate memory and a points in that memory space and use again malloc to allocate memory then a points to a different part of memory but the first one part of memory still exist ?

That is correct. malloc() allocates memory that "exists" until you free it using free(), or do a realloc() that could possibly move your data to a different memory and release the old memory location. I'd recommend you read some documentation about it. The manual page at least.

Also, your code has errors. You use assignment instead of comparison and variable i is not defined. Here is a corrected version with a printf():

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int *a,*a1,*a2;
    int i;

    for (i=1; i<=2; i++) {
        a = malloc(sizeof(int));
        if (i==1)
            a1 = a;
        else if (i==2)
            a2 = a;
    }
    *a1=5;
    *a2=4;

    printf("a1=%d, a2=%d\n", *a1, *a2);

    free(a1);
    free(a2);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Hope it helps. Good Luck!

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