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I am new to multi-threading and would like to avoid a race condition that is occurring in the below code. In the release() method there is a line available.add(resource) and in the remove() method there is a line available.remove(resource). So my question is how do I synchronize the 'resource' variable to avoid this race condition?

    package threadpool;
    import java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
    import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentHashMap;
    import java.util.concurrent.ConcurrentMap;
    import java.util.concurrent.CountDownLatch;
    import java.util.concurrent.LinkedBlockingQueue;
    import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

    public class ResourcePoolImpl<R> implements ResourcePool<R> {

    private static final String CLOSED_POOL_EXCEPTION = "Pool is closed,cannot aquire resource.";

    private static final String  RELEASE_EXCEPTION = "Unaquired resource, cannot release it.";

    private volatile boolean open = false;

    private final BlockingQueue<R> available = new LinkedBlockingQueue<R>();

    private final ConcurrentMap<R, CountDownLatch> aquired = new ConcurrentHashMap<R,  CountDownLatch>();

    public R acquire() throws InterruptedException {
    if ( !open ) { throw new IllegalStateException( CLOSED_POOL_EXCEPTION ); }
    final R resource = available.take();
    if ( resource != null ) {
        aquired.put( resource, new CountDownLatch( 1 ) );
    }
    return resource;
    }


   public R acquire( final long timeout, final TimeUnit timeUnit ) throws InterruptedException {
    if ( !open ) { throw new IllegalStateException( CLOSED_POOL_EXCEPTION ); }

    final R resource = available.poll( timeout, timeUnit );
    if ( resource != null ) {
        aquired.put( resource, new CountDownLatch( 1 ) );
    }
    return resource;
    }


    public boolean add( final R resource ) 
    {
    return available.add( resource );
    } 

    public void close() throws InterruptedException {
    open = false;
    for ( final CountDownLatch latch : aquired.values() ) {
        latch.await();
    }
    }

    public void closeNow() {
    open = false;
    }

    public boolean isOpen() {
    return open;
    }

    public void open() {
    open = true;
    }

    public void release( final R resource ) 
    {
    final CountDownLatch latch = aquired.get( resource );
    if ( latch == null ) { throw new IllegalArgumentException( RELEASE_EXCEPTION ); }
    available.add( resource );
    latch.countDown();
    }

    public boolean remove( final R resource ) throws InterruptedException 
    {   

    final CountDownLatch latch = aquired.get( resource );
    if ( latch != null ) {
        latch.await();
    }
    return available.remove( resource );
    }


    public boolean removeNow( final R resource ) {
    return available.remove( resource );
    }

 }
share|improve this question
    
how do you know you have a race condition? –  jco.owens Jan 9 '13 at 14:18
    
available is a BlockingQueue, which is a concurrent collection, it should not be a problem if two threads are using it. –  lbalazscs Jan 9 '13 at 14:20
    
concurrent collections only guarantee that put/get are "atomic"; the race condition may be outside this code (for example, you may be modifying the resource from two places at once...). Are you sure that the problem is in this code? –  tucuxi Jan 9 '13 at 14:23
    
It would be interesting to know how you think this pool is supposed to behave. –  bowmore Jan 9 '13 at 22:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declare a

final Object mutex = new Object();

and have all methods that do read/write operations on shared collections aquire the mutex before doing the operations, or make decisions based on shared data, execute within a synchronized block:

synchronized (mutex) {
     // .. guaranteed single-threaded access here
     //   (for instance, contents of aquire() or release(); 
     //      also add() or any other collection access)
}

You can then use the simpler non-concurrent collection classes, as within the mutex-guarded areas, there cannot be any multi-threaded access.

Concurrent collections simply wrap their accesses within their own internal mutual-exclusion locks -- but the problem, as you explain in your comments, is that aquired and available may be updated independently of each other, which you definitely do not want.

Therefore: simplify your code by declaring and using a single mutex for all critical-area accesses.

share|improve this answer
1  
in the above code for example, it may lead to a resource being added back into the pool after it has been removed if the 'release' and 'remove' methods are called at the same time by different threads, which is what i want to avoid. –  user1617731 Jan 9 '13 at 14:55
    
What about using the mutex approach for all methods in the ResourcePool?. Make each of them synchronize their critical areas on a single mutex, and you can dispense with all those thread-safe collections (since the mutex will be protecting them all). –  tucuxi Jan 9 '13 at 15:10
    
That will definitely help...but i was thinking of a better way to do it, like without having to use synchronize on all methods unnecessarily.. –  user1617731 Jan 9 '13 at 15:25
    
so you mean to say that there should not be a race condition at all in this situation? that it is handled by these collections? –  user1617731 Jan 9 '13 at 15:34
    
After looking at java sources, those collections you use are relying on [grepcode.com/file/repository.grepcode.com/java/root/jdk/openjdk/… ReentrantLocks], with very similar semantics to the built-in lock provided by synchronized(). I cannot imagine that there will be any performance difference; if there were, the single-mutex version should be faster (1 lock instead of several). Plus, you would avoid the race condition... –  tucuxi Jan 9 '13 at 15:35

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