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I have an encrypt routine in c++, I translate this to C#:

example:

public void main()
{
    string myPwd = "ÖFÖæ6";
    string pwdCoded = XEncrypt.EncryptData_Patch_x_Net(myPwd);
    //Result OK: ÖFÖæ–6
}

public static string EncryptData_Patch_x_Net(string Data)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[Data.Length];

    for (int n = 0; n < Data.Length; n++)
    {
        bytes[n] = (byte)Data[n];
    }

    System.Text.Encoding MyEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.Default;
    String MyResult = MyEncoding.GetString(bytes);
    return MyResult;
}

I need to make the inverse routine that made it convert from:

ÖFÖæ–6 to ÖFÖæ6 (notice there's a dash in the left string)

I did this last function, but erroneously performs the encoding

public static string DecryptData_Patch_x_Net(string Data)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[Data.Length];

    for (int n = 0; n < Data.Length; n++)
    {
        bytes[n] = (byte)Data[n];
    }

    System.Text.Encoding MyEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding(1252);
    String MyResult = MyEncoding.GetString(bytes);
    return MyResult;
}
share|improve this question
4  
What is your question? –  Roy Dictus Jan 9 '13 at 14:20
3  
encryption != encoding, decryption != decoding. Anyway, all strings in .Net are unicode. –  Jodrell Jan 9 '13 at 14:32
    
I ran your code, and didn't get your expected result ÖFÖæ–6. My default encoding is 1252, as I imagine yours is too. –  Jonathan Jan 9 '13 at 14:37
    
what is the point of ? –  PaRiMaL RaJ Jan 9 '13 at 14:38
    
You can use the System.Text.Encoding namespace to control how strings are converted to and from byte[]s and Streams but, all strings are unicode. –  Jodrell Jan 9 '13 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

This is not encryption and you are seriously complicating what it actually is.

Encoding iso88591 = Encoding.GetEncoding(28591);
Encoding w1252 = Encoding.GetEncoding(1252);

//
string pwd = "ÖFÖæ\u00966"; //The SPA control character will not survice a Stackoverflow post
                            //So I use \u0096 to represent it

string result = w1252.GetString(iso88591.GetBytes(pwd)); //"ÖFÖæ–6"

string original = iso88591.GetString(w1252.GetBytes(result)); //"ÖFÖæ6" with the hidden control character before 6

Console.WriteLine(result == "ÖFÖæ–6"); //True
Console.WriteLine(original == "ÖFÖæ\u00966"); //True
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Your misnamed ...Encrypt... function makes a fundamental error. You take a string, which treat as a char[] (thats fine), then explicitly cast each char to a byte. That is a narrowing conversion. You'll lose any of the high bits and the ability to round trip more unusual chars. If you look at this question it should help to understand.

You could use this function to get the bytes without loss of information,

static byte[] GetBytes(string str)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[str.Length * sizeof(char)];
    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(str.ToCharArray(), 0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
    return bytes;
}

The byte array will round trip on systems that share endianess.


As Esailija states, becuase its simple and it will explicitly return little endian results, you're better off calling

byte[] Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(string)

To achieve the same.

share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't lose high bits, but unicode code points that are above 255 (such as , but not Ö or æ for example). What your function does is a convoluted way of calling Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(str), that is, encode a string as UTF-16LE. –  Esailija Jan 9 '13 at 15:14
    
@Esailija, I agree with you comment. The higher code points are stored in the high bits. If the chars are stored with the right Endianess this code is equivalent to Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(str). –  Jodrell Jan 9 '13 at 15:21
    
Ah yes, the internal encoding varies depending on machine. In that case BitConverter.IsLittleEndian ? Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(str) : Encoding.BigEndianUnicode.GetBytes(str) can be used. But his "encryption" doesn't want UTF-16 at all is my point. –  Esailija Jan 9 '13 at 15:22
    
@Esailija I'm not sure what the OP wants to be honest. –  Jodrell Jan 9 '13 at 15:38

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