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I have to write a function that does what you read below, but using pointers (so I have to delete "i" and the operator [])... So the initial declaration would be something like void match (int *a, int *a, int n), but then how can I handle the increment without using "i"? Thank you :)

void match (int a[], int b[], int n) {
int i;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
a[i] = b[i];
}
share|improve this question
2  
Also, unless you're having to write a function as homework, why don't you memcpy()? – user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 14:53
up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is called "assigning", in C.

And it's much easier to do with memcpy(), which is the standard way of copying memory blocks:

memcpy(a, b, n * sizeof *a);

Failing that, you can of course use pointer arithmetic, or take in pointers but use array notation in the function itself:

void assign(int *a, const int *b, int n)
{
  int i;

  for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    a[i] = b[i];
}

Note how the source pointer b is marked as const, to signal that it's a read-only parameter.

With pointer arithmetic, it'd be something like:

void assign(int *a, const int *b, int n)
{
  const int *end = b + n;
  while(b < end)
   *a++ = *b++;
}
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Here you go:

while (n > 0) {
    n--;
    *a++ = *b++;
}
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void match (int *a, int *b, int n) {
    int *c;
    c = a;
    while ((a-c)<n) {
        *a=*b;
        a++; b++;
    }
}

I suggest to change you function name to copy instead of match. Because match means that you want to compare arrays

share|improve this answer
    
The question is about assigning the values in b to a, not comparing the two arrays. – jonhopkins Jan 9 '13 at 14:55
    
I see that in the code, But the function name look that he is looking for a function which compare arrays – MOHAMED Jan 9 '13 at 14:56
    
Any way I will update my answer for that – MOHAMED Jan 9 '13 at 14:57
    
I agree, it is somewhat misleading. But he seems to know that he wants assignment. On the other hand, your original code is interesting. I've never seen something like while ((a-c)<n), but I'll keep it in mind. – jonhopkins Jan 9 '13 at 14:59

Pointer arithmetic:

int* pa = NULL;
for (pa = a; pa != a + n; pa++)
{
  *pa;
}

The above loop has pa point to each member of a in turn, and dereferences it.

It also helps to remember that a[i] = *(a+i)

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You probably meant *pa = *pb where pb is some pointer iterating from b to b+n but not mentioned in your code... – Lundin Jan 9 '13 at 15:09
    
@Lundin, I meant for the OP to complete the picture himself. Although that's moot now... – StoryTeller Jan 9 '13 at 15:12

You can increment the pointer itself:

void copy(int *a, int *b, size_t sz)
{
    int *p = a;
    while (p - a < sz) {
        *p++ = *b++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can increment a pointer, it's part of the C pointer arithmetic. Suppose i is a pointer to an element of an array, ++i is a pointer to the next element of the array. The compiler automatically find the size of the pointed element (looking at the type of the pointer) and increase the pointer by the right offset.

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The most common (in my experience) and most effective way to implement memcpy in C is this:

void my_memcpy (void* s1, const void* s2, size_t n)
{
  uint8_t*       u_s1 = s1;
  const uint8_t* u_s2 = s2;

  while(n != 0)
  {
    *u_s1 = *u_s2;

    u_s1++;
    u_s2++;  
    n--;
  }
}

Please note that n != 0 is absolutely essential, you cannot use n > 0 or the code will crash and burn when n is of type size_t, rather than int.

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1  
It should be noted however that standard library memcpy() is most likely heavily optimized by the compiler and written in inline assembler, so it will most likely be even more effective than the above. – Lundin Jan 9 '13 at 15:19

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