Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have some code that at one part will get executed a lot, and I'm wondernig which way is a more efficient implementation. I will use a for loop to simulate the part the gets executed alot:

option A:

my %sections = (
    'somestring1' => 1,
    'somestring2' => 1,
    'somestring3' => 1,
    'somestring4' => 1
);

for (0..10000)
{
    # $element is chosen at random
    $namespace = $element if $sections{$element};
}

option B:

for (0..10000)
{
    # $element is chosen at random
    $namespace = $element if ($element eq'somestring1' || 
                            $element eq'somestring2' ||
                            $element eq'somestring3' ||
                            $element eq'somestring4');
}

Can anyone benchmark this or know the answer as I am not familiar with benchmarking tools.

This code probably doesn't make sense in this context but it is in fact what I need to use.

share|improve this question
2  
First make it run, then make it fast. –  Decio Lira Sep 14 '09 at 21:08
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Use the cmpthese function from the Benchmark module

use strict;
use warnings;
use Benchmark qw'cmpthese';

my %sections = (
    somestring1 => 1,
    somestring2 => 1,
    somestring3 => 1,
    somestring4 => 1
);

my @elements = map { 'somestring' . int(1 + rand(10)) } 1 .. 100;

my $namespace;

cmpthese(100000, {
    hash_value => sub {
        foreach my $element (@elements) {
            $namespace = $element if $sections{$element};
        }
    },
    hash_exists => sub {
        foreach my $element (@elements) {
            $namespace = $element if exists $sections{$element};
        }
    },
    string_cmp => sub {
        foreach my $element (@elements) {
            $namespace = $element if (
                $element eq'somestring1' ||
                $element eq'somestring2' ||
                $element eq'somestring3' ||
                $element eq'somestring4');
        }
    },
});

My results (running Perl 5.10 on WinXP):

               Rate  string_cmp  hash_value hash_exists
string_cmp  18932/s          --        -44%        -50%
hash_value  33512/s         77%          --        -12%
hash_exists 38095/s        101%         14%          --

So a hash lookup is 77% faster than the cascaded string comparisons and checking for hash existence instead of value (as Adam Bellaire suggested) is 14% faster still.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a bad feeling, but I'd be interested to see how testing against the regex /^somestring[1234]$/ would compare to those three methods. I expect it not to be as fast as exists but I'd like to see how it stacks up against the string comparison. –  Chris Lutz Sep 14 '09 at 21:02
    
I show /^somestring[1234]$/ as about 3% slower than the string comparisons, though real-world performance would depend heavily on the number of keys and the pattern (if any) in their values. –  Michael Carman Sep 14 '09 at 21:08
1  
<3 Michael Carman... give a man a fish... teach a man to fish... etc –  mikegrb Sep 15 '09 at 13:07
add comment

My guess is that the first version, with exists is going to be faster, not to mention more readable and maintainable.

for (0..10000)
{
    # $element is chosen at random
    $namespace = $element if exists $sections{$element};
}

Merely checking for the existence of a hash key is quicker than retrieving its value for comparison, so use exists.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The hash lookup mechanism is considerably faster.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This is probably the time to get familiar with benchmarking tools, like the CPAN module Benchmark.

share|improve this answer
    
This is true, however if the hash becomes very large, I can't imagine advocating inlining the values into a giant boolean expression for performance reasons. –  Adam Bellaire Sep 14 '09 at 20:50
    
You're right, which means I misunderstood the question.. I thought the OP was wanting to check if the key was in a subset of all keys in the hash, rather than in the hash itself. Fixing response. :) –  Ether Sep 14 '09 at 20:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.