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struct {
    char a;
    int b;
} x;

Why would one define a struct like that instead of just declaring it as:

struct x {
    char a;
    int b;
};
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5 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

In the first case, only variable x can be of that type -- strictly, if you defined another structure y with the same body, it would be a different type. So you use it when you won't ever need any other variables of the same type. Note that you cannot cast things to that type, declare or define functions with prototypes that use that type, or even dynamically allocate variables of that type - there is no name for the type to use.

In the second case, you do not define a variable - you just define a type struct x, which can then be used to create as many variables as you need of that type. This is the more normal case, of course. It is often combined with, or associated with, a typedef:

typedef struct x
{
    char a;
    int b;
} x;

Usually, you'd use a more informative tag name and type name. It is perfectly legal and safe to use the same name for the structure tag (the first 'x') and the typedef name (the second 'x').

To a first approximation, C++ automatically 'creates a typedef' for you when you use the plain 'struct x { ... };' notation (whether or not you define variables at the same time). For fairly complete details on the caveats associated with the term 'first approximation', see the extensive comments below. Thanks to all the commentators who helped clarify this to me.

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don`t know about first case details, thanks for pointing it out –  chester89 Sep 14 '09 at 21:04
    
Good explanation. And also notice that for the first, you cannot place it at namespace scope. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 14 '09 at 22:00
    
"C++ in effect does that automatically for you when you use the plain 'struct x { ... };' notation" Unless there is a function of the same name visible, in which case C++ can only use 'struct x' as a typename, not x alone, just the same as C. –  Steve Jessop Sep 14 '09 at 23:06
    
@onebyone: what you are saying is substantially the same as what @dribeas said in response to my comment to the answer by @fbinder. I'm wondering if I should drag these comments into the actual answer? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 23:16
    
@litb: are you saying that you could not do: namespace z { struct { ... } x; } and then refer to it using z::x;, for example? If so, why? If that isn't what you're saying, please can you clarify? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 23:18
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In the first case you are declaring a variable. In the second, a type. I think a better approach would be:

typedef struct tag_x {
    char a;
    int b;
} x;
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OK, but what about the question: Why would you define a struct one way instead of another? –  Rob Kennedy Sep 14 '09 at 20:44
    
Why use tag_x and x to refer to the same thing. Structure and union and enum tags are in a separate namespace from the ordinary identifiers namespace where typedefs are defined, so there is no conflict -- and C++ effectively creates 'typedef struct x { ... } x;' automatically. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 20:46
    
Might be good to edit to include the usage: x my_struct; my_struct.a = 'a'; my_struct.b = 1; –  ThePosey Sep 14 '09 at 20:46
1  
Jonathan: Strictly speaking in C++ the compiler does not create the typedef for you, it allows you to create instances of the type without the struct keyword, but that is not the same as a typedef. There are subtle and not so subtle differences. In the code: 'typedef struct x { int a; } y; void x() {} void y() {}', declaring the x function is correct as it does not collide with the struct x. On the other hand, y cannot be redeclared as a function as it will collide with the typedef-ed definition. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 14 '09 at 20:56
    
@dribeas: wow! I have little doubt you are right. I think it would be lousy coding to try what you show, but that's never stopped anybody writing such code - either deliberately or accidentally - before. For the purposes of the OP, the statement qualified with 'effectively' is probably close enough to accurate not to mislead seriously - and your note clarifies in case of doubt. Thanks for the info. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 21:00
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The first defines an variable named 'x' whose type is an unnamed structure.

The second defines a structure named x, but doesn't define anything that uses it.

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The first is equivalent to

struct unnamed_struct {  char a;    int b;};
unnamed_struct x;

only that the struct type has no name.

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Only in C++; in C, you need 'struct unnamed_struct x;'. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 20:42
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The two do different things:

struct {
   char a;
   int b;
} x;

Declares a variable x of type struct { char a; int b; }

struct x {
   char a;
   int b;
};

Declares a type struct x. To get a variable of that type, you would later need to do this:

struct x x = {0};
x x = {0}; // C++ only

The second one is more common, because it can make declarations shorter, especially if you have to change your struct. The first is used if you're never going to need the structure again and don't want to pollute your namespace. So basically never.

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