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I have my own class which extends Activity. And I have another class which extends my first class. How I can get data from second class in first class? This is schema for better understanding: class1 extends Activity, class2 extends class1. Now I want to get in class1 some data from class2. How can I do that?

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Use some variable and a setter method (or public variable) in class1. –  Stefan de Bruijn Jan 9 '13 at 14:58
1  
class2 can access protected members from its parent class1. But it doesn't make sense in the other way round ("get in class1 some data from class2") –  fiddler Jan 9 '13 at 15:05
    
May make if the derived class must provide some important information for the parent class. –  h22 Jan 9 '13 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can set a property in class 1 (parent) and assign it from class 2

 class A {
      protected int a;
 }

 class B extends A {

      void method() {
           a = 1;
      }
 }
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class A {
private int x = 5;

protected int getX() {
    return x;
}

protected void setX(int x) {
    this.x = x;
}

public void print() {
    // getX() is used such that 
    // subclass overriding getX() can be reflected in print();
    System.out.println(getX());
   }
}

class B extends A {
public B() {

}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    B b = new B();
    b.setX(10);
    b.print();
}
}
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You can get data from derived class upstream into parent class by overriding the getter:

abstract class A {
  protected abstract int getX();

  void doThis() {
    int x = getX(); 
  }
}

class B extends A {
 @Override
 protected int getX() { return 17; };
}

This is useful if the derived class must provide some values as there are no reasonable defaults. The class that fails to do this (does not implement the abstract getter method) simply will not compile, and the error message will be the clear hint that should be done. With assignable inner fields, most you can do is to check already at runtime.

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