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I have a class that has some functions about accounts management, and I also got a class that validates email addresses, usernames and more.

How do I use the validation class inside the accounts class? How do I include it easliy?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by PeeHaa, andrewsi, hichris123, aksu, kumar_v Mar 24 '14 at 7:41

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
you can extend the class or make it as an inner class –  Hamed Al-Khabaz Jan 9 '13 at 14:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If one class is specifically designed for validation purposes and another class is designed to contain instance-specific information, then there are three different approaches you can take.

1) Statically reference the validator (recommended):

<?php
class Validation {
  public static function validateEmail($email) {
    return filter_var($email, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL);
  }
}

class AccountManagement {
  public $email;
  public function __construct($email) {
    $this->email = $email;

    // Validate the e-mail. If not valid, an exception is thrown.
    if(!Validation::validateEmail($this->email)) {
      throw new InvalidArgumentException('$email argument supplied must contain a valid e-mail address');
    }
  }
}

2) Extend your instance class to inherit from your validation class

<?php
class Validation {
  public function validateEmail($email) {
    return filter_var($email, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL);
  }
}

class AccountManagement extends Validation {
  public $email;
  public function __construct($email) {
    $this->email = $email;

    // Validate the e-mail. If not valid, an exception is thrown.
    if(!$this->validateEmail($this->email)) {
      throw new InvalidArgumentException('$email argument supplied must contain a valid e-mail address');
    }
  }
}

3) Instantiate your validation class from within your instance class (NOT RECOMMENDED):

<?php
class Validation {
  public function validateEmail($email) {
    return filter_var($email, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL);
  }
}

class AccountManagement extends Validation {
  public $email;
  public function __construct($email) {
    $this->email = $email;

    $validator = new Validation;

    // Validate the e-mail. If not valid, an exception is thrown.
    if(!$validator->validateEmail($this->email)) {
      throw new InvalidArgumentException('$email argument supplied must contain a valid e-mail address');
    }
  }
}

Testing your implementation

Once you've chosen the method which best fits your needs (regardless of which one you choose), you can test it with the following code:

// Valid, should not throw an exception and should print success.
try {
  $account = New AccountManagement('me@myself.com');
  print "AccountManagement object successfully instantiated.<br />\r\n";
} catch(Exception $e) {
  print 'Error: Encountered ' . $e;
}

// Invalid, should throw an InvalidArgumentException exception
try {
  $account = New AccountManagement('myself.com');
  print "AccountManagement object successfully instantiated.<br />\r\n";
} catch(Exception $e) {
  print 'Error: Encountered ' . $e;
}

Bonus Example:

Sometimes, you may want to specifically catch Validation errors, and let something take care of any other exceptions which may be encountered. In this case, we can create a special exception just for our validator, and allow the validator to be the one to throw the exception:

<?php
class ValidationException extends Exception {
  // Will use default Exception behavior.
}

class Validation {
  public static function validateEmail($email) {
    if(!filter_var($email, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) {
      throw new ValidationException('E-mail address supplied is not valid');
    }
  }
}

class AccountManagement {
  public $email;
  public function __construct($email) {
    $this->email = $email;

    // Validate the e-mail.
    Validation::validateEmail($this->email);
  }
}

// Valid, should not throw an exception and should print success.
try {
  $account = New AccountManagement('me@myself.com');
  print "AccountManagement object successfully instantiated.<br />\r\n";
} catch(Exception $e) {
  print 'Error: Encountered ' . $e;
}

// Invalid, should throw an ValidationException exception
try {
  $account = New AccountManagement('myself.com');
  print "AccountManagement object successfully instantiated.<br />\r\n";
} catch(ValidationException $e) {
  print 'Error: Encountered ' . $e;
}
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1  
Didn't know that before, exactly what I needed. Thank you very much :) –  Alon Pini Jan 9 '13 at 15:07
    
I don't think use "print" is a reusable pattern for an HTML validator... –  X-Blaster Jan 9 '13 at 15:08
1  
it's for a proof of concept, not for production. –  Joshua Burns Jan 9 '13 at 15:09
1  
Some significant changes have been made to the examples for the prude at heart (@X-Blaster): Replaced print statements with Exceptions for real-to-life scenarios. Added additional examples showcasing a few different implementations to fit the need of specific desires or behaviors. Added an example utilizing a custom exception for catching Validation-specific exceptions. –  Joshua Burns Feb 19 '13 at 22:58

You could instantiate the validation class and pass it into the accounts class as a paramater and set it as a property within the accounts class in the accounts constructor method?

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Is it the easiest way doing that? That's the way I use right now. –  Alon Pini Jan 9 '13 at 15:04
1  
Depends if the validation really needs to be an object. You can do as Joshua has suggested and use static methods within a class which doesn't require to be instantiated but you'll still need to include the validation file before calling a validation method. If you do go down that route you might want to look into spl_autoload_register and lazy-loading. –  tavocado Jan 9 '13 at 15:06

You can maybe create a third class "AccountsManagementValidator" with methods

validate(AccountManagement): void
hasErrors(): boolean
getErrors(): List<Error>

There's a lot of different implementation but this I described is PlayFramework validator implementation.

Of course your "validator" class reuse your common method to validate email, users, etc...

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