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I trying to init a filtered value without success. I'll use partial/ng-include so variable's name can't change.

I using angularjs v1.0.2 and I tried also with v1.1.1

<script>
    function Ctrl($scope) {
      $scope.trains = [ 1, 2];
    }
</script>


<div ng-app ng-controller="Ctrl">
  <div ng-init="t = (trains | filter:1)">    
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:1 }}
  </div>
  <div ng-init="t = (trains | filter:2)">
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:2 }}
  </div>
</div>

The output

[2] [1]
[2] [2]

Here is this example -> http://jsfiddle.net/9q5D4/4/

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not sure this is what you want... But you can use directive in order to combine between ng-init and ng-include:

HTML:

<div ng-app="myApp" ng-controller="Ctrl">    
    <my-directive field-name=1 train=2></my-directive>
    <my-directive field-name=2 train=17></my-directive>
</div>

JS:

function Ctrl($scope, $filter) {
  $scope.trains = [1, 2]; 
}

angular.module("myApp", [])
.directive("myDirective", function() {
    return {
        restrict: "E",
        scope: 'isolate',
        template: "<div>{{exposeAttribute}} {{anotherOne}}</div>",
        controller: Ctrl,
        //templateUrl: "mytemplate.html",
        link: function(scope, element, attr) {
            scope.exposeAttribute = attr.fieldName;
            scope.anotherOne = attr.train;
        }
    };
});

and the output is:

1 2

2 17

http://jsfiddle.net/9q5D4/5/

share|improve this answer

Be careful with the ng-init expression (especially if you are initializing new variables). In your example you are running 2 separate expressions: t = trains and filter:<X>.

You should use t = (trains | filter:<X>):

<div ng-app ng-controller="Ctrl">
  <div ng-init="t = (trains | filter:1)">    
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:1 }}
  </div>
  <div ng-init="tt = (trains | filter:2)">
    {{ tt }}
    {{ trains | filter:2 }}
  </div>
</div>

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/9q5D4/2/

share|improve this answer
    
The is almost what I want. I'll also use ng-include so I can't rename the variable. – Damax Jan 9 '13 at 16:01
    
@Damax don't forget to accept the answer – bmleite Jan 9 '13 at 23:08
    
If I use partial this solution don't work – Damax Jan 14 '13 at 10:10
1  
@Damax what do you mean by "If I use partial"? Can you provide an example (fiddle)? Also, don't update your question with an answer, it will confuse further visitors... – bmleite Jan 15 '13 at 9:25

Are you trying to iterate through $scope.trains? In that case you should use ng-repeat. I don't believe filters are applicable for ng-init.

http://jsfiddle.net/gtmuh/

<div ng-app ng-controller="Ctrl">
  <div ng-repeat="t in trains | filter:1">
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:1 }}
  </div>
  <div ng-repeat="t in trains | filter:2">
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:2 }}
  </div>
share|improve this answer
    
I want to keep the code DRY by using partial with ng-include. Inside the partial I iterate on t. – Damax Jan 9 '13 at 15:43

I haven't checked out exactly why or how, but seems like placing a ng-if attribute before the ng-init makes it work.

tested on angular 1.2+;

<div ng-app ng-controller="Ctrl">
    <div ng-init="t = (trains | filter:1)">    
        {{ t }}
        {{ trains | filter:1 }}
    </div>
    <div ng-if="true" ng-init="t = (trains | filter:2)">
    {{ t }}
    {{ trains | filter:2 }}
    </div>
</div>
share|improve this answer

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