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I'm trying to learn a little more about D's compile time evaluation and understand how its templates, mixins, attributes, etc all work. One thing I'd like to try and do is figure out an elegant way to mark a class's members as being serializable or loadable from a database. In the example below, I've created a tuple that lists which members to use when reading or (later on) serializing the instance.

My first question is, is this a proper usage of tuples as it stands below? And secondly, if so, is there a way to generate this tuple automatically at compile time using the user defined attributes I've assigned to the relevant member variables? I've dug through the various documentation pages like http://dlang.org/attribute.html and http://dlang.org/phobos/std_traits.html but I can't seem to figure out how to use them properly for this purpose (i.e. looping through a class's members and determining which variables have the desired attribute). I'm also not quite certain if I have completely the wrong idea about how attributes are supposed to be used. Any suggestions on the best way to go about this would be appreciated.

enum ENCODABLE = 1;
alias string[string] Row;
template Tuple (T...) { alias T Tuple; }

class A {
    @(ENCODABLE) string name;
    @(ENCODABLE) int x;
    int* p;

    alias Tuple!("name","x") encodables;

    this(Row row) {
        foreach (var; encodables) {
            __traits(getMember, this, var) = to!(typeof(__traits(getMember, this, var)))(row[var]);
        }
    }
}

void main() {
    Row row = ["name":"Asdf", "x":"120"]; // Simulated database row
    auto a = new A(row);
    writefln("%s,%d,%d", a.name, a.x, a.p); // Asdf,120,null
}
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2 Answers 2

This isn't much of an answer, but I used them by defining my own helper templates, and using structs as UDAs (with their values indicating parameters). The helper templates are here:

https://github.com/CyberShadow/ae/blob/master/utils/meta.d#L133

They're used here, to allow overriding the JSON field for a JSON serializer/unserializer:

https://github.com/CyberShadow/ae/blob/master/utils/json.d#L505

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've managed to get it working with the following code, and a little help from the isValueInTuple template based on code provided in CyberShadow's answer. It still feels a bit clunky, but seems to get the job done. Comments/criticism welcome if I'm doing something horrible against the nature of templates!

enum {
    ENCODABLE = "ENCODABLE",
};
alias string[string] Row;
template Tuple(T...) { alias T Tuple; }
template isValueInTuple(string s, T...) {
    static if (T.length == 0) {
        enum bool isValueInTuple = false;
    } else static if (T.length == 1) {
        static if (is(typeof(T[0]) == typeof(s))) {
            enum bool isValueInTuple = T[0] == s;
        } else {
            enum bool isValueInTuple = false;
        }
    } else {
        enum bool isValueInTuple = isValueInTuple!(s, T[0]) || isValueInTuple!(s, T[1..$]);
    }
}
template GenEncodables(U) {
    string GenEncodables() {
        string ret = "alias Tuple!(";
        int fn = 0;
        foreach (index, field; __traits(allMembers, U)) {
            static if (field != "Monitor") { // better way to avoid compilation errors here?
                static if (isAssignable!(typeof(mixin(U.stringof~"."~field)))) {
                    static if (isValueInTuple!(ENCODABLE, __traits(getAttributes, mixin(U.stringof~"."~field)))) {
                        if (fn++)
                            ret ~= ",";
                        ret ~= `"`~field~`"`;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        ret ~= ") encodables;";
        return ret;
    }
}
mixin template Encodables() {
    mixin(GenEncodables!(typeof(this)));
}


class A {
    @ENCODABLE string name;
    @ENCODABLE int x;
    int *p;

    this() {}

    mixin Encodables; // must come after this() definition, apparently!

    this(Row row) {
        foreach (var; encodables) {
            pragma(msg, "Reading parameter "~var~" from row");
            __traits(getMember, this, var) = to!(typeof(__traits(getMember, this, var)))(row[var]);
        }
    }
}
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