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#define _CRTDBG_MAP_ALLOC
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <crtdbg.h>
#include <thread>

using namespace std;

void Hello()
{}

int main()
{
    {
        std::thread(Hello).join();
    }    

    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
}

The output windows shows: (VC++ compiler version: Nov 2012 CTP)

The thread 0x5ab8 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
Detected memory leaks!
Dumping objects ->
{261} normal block at 0x002A2E00, 44 bytes long.
 Data: <                > 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 0A 00 00 00 
Object dump complete.
The thread 0x5abc has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The thread 0x5ab4 has exited with code 0 (0x0).
The program '[0x5A94] C++11.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0).
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3  
Make this in a for loop and take a look if leak is growing or not. It may be some lazy initialized data structures that are initialized only once and seem to be "leak". –  Kamil Klimek Jan 9 '13 at 15:34
8  
Maybe this could help: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/757212/… ? –  Aschratt Jan 9 '13 at 15:36
    
@Aschratt You should turn that comment into an answer. –  Gorpik Jan 9 '13 at 15:45
    
Leak detection is imperfect, especially for implementation-specific runtime-owned objects that it knows it'll get around to cleaning up later. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 15:56
9  
Yeah, don't we all dislike Microsoft developers that leave their email address for everybody to use. Stephan always responds, if the message isn't the typical MS hate anyway. –  Hans Passant Jan 9 '13 at 16:47

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