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I've been very puzzled by the following egrep behavior:

I have an LF-terminated file. When I grep for $'\n' all lines are returned as expected. But all lines are returned when I grep for $'\r\n' even though I have no carriage returns in the file. Why does grep behave in this puzzling way?

[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ cat sample.txt
a
b
n
c
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ file sample.txt
sample.txt: ASCII text
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ egrep $'\n' sample.txt 
a
b
n
c
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ egrep $'\r\n' sample.txt 
a
b
n
c

Furthermore, when I convert the file to CRLF terminated, egreping for newlines matches all lines but egreping for carriagereturn+newline returns empty strings. Why?

[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ unix2dos sample.txt 
unix2dos: converting file sample.txt to DOS format ...
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ file sample.txt 
sample.txt: ASCII text, with CRLF line terminators
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ egrep $'\n' sample.txt 
a
b
n
c
[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ egrep $'\r\n' sample.txt 




[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ 

And finally, if I egrep '\n' with strong quotes but without C-style escape, I get a match for the "n" even though there is no backslash. Why?

[pjanowsk@krakow myplay2]$ egrep '\n' sample.txt 
n
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The first egrep is returning every row because your shell is treating $'\n' as a variable named '\n'. That variable evaluates to an empty string, and so egrep sees "egrep '' sample.txt". That returns all rows.

I don't think grep or egrep allow matching of the end-of-line characters themselves. They use the EOLs to break the file into lines which either match or not.

You could use pcregrep, which will use "perl compatible" regular expressions, and will happily match multi-line regexes.

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Could try one of these

  -U, --binary              do not strip CR characters at EOL (MSDOS)
  -u, --unix-byte-offsets   report offsets as if CRs were not there (MSDOS)
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