Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For instance: c:\dir1 c:\dir2 "c:\my files" c:\code "old photos" "new photos"

Should be read as a list:

  • c:\dir1
  • c:\dir2
  • c:\my files
  • c:\code
  • old photos
  • new photos

I can write a function which parses the string linearly but wondered if the .NET 2.0 toolbox has any cool tricks one could use?

share|improve this question
    
Am I correct to assume that the quotes " are the delimiters and if they are missing that the spaces are the delimiters? –  Erno de Weerd Jan 9 '13 at 16:15
    
what is .NET 2.0 toolbox ? –  Bolu Jan 9 '13 at 16:16
    
Are you referring to the toolbox in visual studio? –  Saju Jan 9 '13 at 16:28
    
I think you could do this with Regex but given you have to process each char in order I think linear would be fastest. foreach (char c in dirlist.ToCharArray –  Blam Jan 9 '13 at 17:26
    
Yup, a regular expression is probably the "simplest" you can get when you want to optimize caller code complexity. (And it shouldn't be too bad in terms of speed either when the regex is in compiled mode.) - @Blam: ToCharArray wouldn't be fast, you would make a copy of the input. IndexOfAny with a space and quote to find the next "interesting" offset would be a good option for speed, besides the obvious for-loop. In any ways profiling would be needed to tell the winner. –  Zarat Jan 9 '13 at 17:44
show 6 more comments

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you have to hit every character I think a brute force is going to give you the best performance.
That way you hit every character exactly once.
And it limits the number of comparisons performed.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string input = @"c:\dir1 c:\dir2 ""c:\my files"" c:\code ""old photos"" ""new photos""";
    List<string> splitInput = MySplit(input);
    foreach (string s in splitInput)
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(s);
    }
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(input);
}

public static List<string> MySplit(string input)
{
    List<string> split = new List<string>();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    bool splitOnQuote = false;
    char quote = '"';
    char space = ' ';
    foreach (char c in input.ToCharArray())
    {
        if (splitOnQuote)
        {
            if (c == quote)
            {
                if (sb.Length > 0)
                {
                    split.Add(sb.ToString());
                    sb.Clear();
                }
                splitOnQuote = false;
            }
            else { sb.Append(c); }
        }
        else
        {
            if (c == space)
            {
                if (sb.Length > 0)
                {
                    split.Add(sb.ToString());
                    sb.Clear();
                }
            }
            else if (c == quote)
            {
                if (sb.Length > 0)
                {
                    split.Add(sb.ToString());
                    sb.Clear();
                }
                splitOnQuote = true;
            }

            else { sb.Append(c); }
        }
    }
    if (sb.Length > 0) split.Add(sb.ToString());      
    return split;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Bah, can't get the IndexOfAny one right, it's too complex. Anyways, I'm not saying that a plain for loop can't be faster than IndexOf/IndexOfAny (I said profile!), and the StringBuilder is really clever - my issue with your suggestion was that you loop over ToCharArray instead of doing for(int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++) { char c = input[i]; ... -- if doing the copy and working on char array is really faster than not copy and working on string indexer I have to admit I had a totally wrong idea about string performance. –  Zarat Jan 9 '13 at 22:29
1  
All that trash talk and no code. You owe me a +1 –  Blam Jan 9 '13 at 22:37
    
After profiling I have to grant you that you are right and I'm wrong. Array indexing beats string indexing if I replace your for loop with what I had in mind and commented above. (Rest of your code stays the same.) -- do you have any explanation of why that is, or just figured it out by experimentation? –  Zarat Jan 9 '13 at 22:38
    
Yes I have an explanation but you still owe me a +1 –  Blam Jan 9 '13 at 22:44
    
Yeah, sorry, wasn't sure if it did fit the OP requirements so I had to reread it, I've first been understanding it as "simple way to split string with Framework tools" (where Regex would probably a good choice), but your answer definitely fits the "parse string linearly part". –  Zarat Jan 9 '13 at 22:52
show 5 more comments

Here's a regex-only solution which captures both space-delimited and quoted paths. Quoted paths are stripped of the quotes, multiple spaces don't cause empty list entries. Edge case of mixing a quoted path with a non-quoted path without intervening space is interpreted as multiple entries.

It can be optimized by disabling captures for unused groups but I opted for more readability instead.

static Regex re = new Regex(@"^([ ]*((?<r>[^ ""]+)|[""](?<r>[^""]*)[""]))*[ ]*$");
public static IEnumerable<string> RegexSplit(string input)
{
    var m = re.Match(input ?? "");
    if(!m.Success)
        throw new ArgumentException("Malformed input.");

    return from Capture capture in m.Groups["r"].Captures select capture.Value;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Assuming that a space acts as a delimiter between except when enclosed in quotes (to allow paths to contain spaces), I'd recommend the following algorithm:

ignore_space = false;
i = 0;
list_of_breaks=[];

while(i <  input_length)
{
  if(charat(i) is a space and ignore_space is false)
  {
    add i to list_of_breaks;
  }
  else if(charat(i) is a quote)
  {
    ignore_space = ! ignore_space
  }
}

split the input at the indices listed in list_of_breaks
share|improve this answer
add comment

Usually for this type of problem one could develop a regular expression to parse out the fields. ( "(.*?)" ) would give you all the string values in quotes. You could strip all those values from your string, and then do a simple split on space after all the quoted items are out.

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string myString = "\"test\" test1 \"test2 test3\" test4 test6 \"test5\"";
            string myRegularExpression = @"""(.*?)""";
            List<string> listOfMatches = new List<string>();

            myString = Regex.Replace(myString, myRegularExpression, delegate(Match match)
            {
                string v = match.ToString();
                listOfMatches.Add(v);
                return "";
            });

            var array = myString.Split(' ');
            foreach (string s in array)
            {
                if(s.Trim().Length > 0)
                    listOfMatches.Add(s);
            }

            foreach (string match in listOfMatches)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(match);
            }
            Console.Read();

        }

Unfortunately, I don't think there is any sort of C# kungfu that makes it much simpler. I should add that obviously, this algorithm gives you the items out of order... so if that matters... this isn't a good solution.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.