Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My SQL sense isn't working this morning and I need some help.

I have 3 primary tables, with two intermediate tables between them used for many-to-many relationships: user, users_groups, group, groups_permissions, and permission. Each permission has a name.

I would like to write a query that, given a permission name and a user id, returns the corresponding permission id if the permission exists, and also returns a value if the user has the permission else NULL. That is to say, I want to know both if the permission exists and if the user has the permission in one query. The output should look something like this:

                         |has_permission | does_not_have_permission
-------------------------------------------------------------------
permission_exists        |     (1,1)     |        (1,NULL)
permission_does_not_exist|      N/A      |        [0 rows]

Right now, the query I can think of looks something like this:

SELECT p.id, ug.user_id
FROM permission AS p LEFT JOIN
     groups_permissions AS gp ON p.id = gp.permission_id LEFT JOIN
     group AS g ON gp.group_id = g.id LEFT JOIN
     users_groups AS ug ON ug.group_id = g.id AND ug.user_id = ?
WHERE p.name = ?;

The problem is that this returns more than one row in certain cases. I could throw an ORDER BY u.id DESC and a LIMIT 1 onto it, I think, but will that optimize well? What are the indexes I need for that? Is there another way that I could write this query to get the info I am looking for quickly and easily?

edit: for those who are curious, I am using PostgreSQL, though I'd like the query to be db agnostic if possible.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Would adding distinct work for your query?

SELECT distinct p.id, ug.user_id
FROM permission AS p LEFT JOIN
     groups_permissions AS gp ON p.id = gp.permission_id LEFT JOIN
     group AS g ON gp.group_id = g.id LEFT JOIN
     users_groups AS ug ON ug.group_id = g.id AND ug.user_id = ?
WHERE permission.name = ?;

I think the issue is that some users are getting the same permission from different group memberships.

The problem in your comment can be fixed by doing an aggregation:

SELECT p.id, max(ug.id),
       (case when max(ug.id) is null then 'DENIED' else 'ALLOWED' end)
FROM permission AS p LEFT JOIN
     groups_permissions AS gp ON p.id = gp.permission_id LEFT JOIN
     group AS g ON gp.group_id = g.id LEFT JOIN
     users_groups AS ug ON ug.group_id = g.id AND ug.user_id = ?
WHERE permission.name = ?
group by ug.id
share|improve this answer
    
The problem is that you can have a case where it returns (1,1) and (1,NULL). This happens when a permission belongs to two groups, but the user only belongs to one of them. –  dave mankoff Jan 9 '13 at 17:12
    
I think, in your second query, you mean to group by p.id, and call MAX(ug.id) instead of the other way around. This seems to work. Any idea how to evaluate if it scales or what the indexes should be? –  dave mankoff Jan 9 '13 at 17:19
SELECT p.id, u.user_id
FROM permission AS p 
  LEFT JOIN
    user AS u 
      ON  u.user_id = ? 
      AND EXISTS
          ( SELECT *
            FROM users_groups AS ug 
              JOIN groups_permissions AS gp 
                ON gp.group_id = ug.group_id
            WHERE p.id = gp.permission_id 
              AND u.user_id = ug.user_id
          )
WHERE p.name = ? ;
share|improve this answer

SORRY - Just saw the PostreSQL and db agnostic sentence at the bottom of the original question. This answer will likely apply only to MS SQL Server.

You likely get multiple rows if a user belongs to more than one group that has the same permission. In that case, you need to aggregate them. Would something like this work?

WITH PermissionsForUser AS
(
SELECT
  p.id,
  u.id
FROM permissions p
LEFT JOIN groups_permissions gp
ON p.id = gp.permission_id
LEFT JOIN users_groups ug
ON ug.group_id = gp.group_id
LEFT JOIN users u
ON ug.user_id = u.id
WHERE p.name = @PermissionId
AND u.id = @UserId
)
SELECT
  MAX(p.id) AS permission_id
  MAX(u.id) AS user_id
FROM PermissionsForUser;
share|improve this answer
    
You'd need to move the u.id = @UserId out of the where and to the join condition, since it u.id may be null. The question remains though - will calling max() scale well? What would the necessary indexes be? –  dave mankoff Jan 9 '13 at 16:38
    
Not sure why you would need to move the u.id comparison. I'm testing for equality to the known value. In SQL Server NULL comparisons return NULL not true. You could also remove NULLs from the comparison altogether with: WHERE ISNULL(u.id,0) = ISNULL(@UserId,0) MAX can scale well assuming you support it with the right indexes. –  BStateham Jan 9 '13 at 17:05
    
Maybe I am misunderstanding how SQL Server works, but putting that condition in the WHERE clause means it will only return rows that have both p.name and u.id matching. That means I'll never get a result back where p.id is set, but u.id is NULL because the WHERE clause filters out all of the NULLs. I actually made that mistake in the first version of my query and had to move it to the JOIN. –  dave mankoff Jan 9 '13 at 17:15
    
I understand now. I don't think I'm helping you with your actual question, but just as a discussion point, another possibility on the u.id test would be WHERE u.id IS NULL OR u.id = @UserID. Don't think that has any real impact on the point of your original q. –  BStateham Jan 10 '13 at 15:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.