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I'm trying to write an R script that, as first step, computes dist() and other things for each row of an input matrix and then, as second step of the script, uses each pairs of output matrixes obtained in the step one to make another calculation. My problem is that I'm not able to "conserve" all the matrixes obtained from the step one. Can someone tell me a good strategy?

My code looks like this:

n<- nrow (aa)
output <- matrix (0, n, n)
for (i in 1:n)
{
    for (j in i:n)
    {
        akl<- function (dii){
            ddi<- as.matrix (dii)
            m<- rowMeans(ddi)
            M<- mean(ddi)
            r<- sweep (ddi, 1, m)
            b<- sweep (r, 2, m)
            return (b + M)  
            }
        A<- akl(dist(aa[i,]))
        B<- akl(dist(aa[j,]))
            V <- sqrt ((sqrt (mean(A * A))) * (sqrt(mean(B * B))))
        if (V > 0) {
            output[i,j] <- (sqrt(mean(A * B))) / V else output[i,j] <- 0
            }
    }
}   

I would like to obtain all the resulting matrixes from the akl function and then use them for the rest of the calculation. The script that I show here is to expensive in terms of time because it compute akl everytime and for large input matrix is a problem.

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Substitute else with } else { before trying to avoid the nested for loops and possibly vectorize. –  Roland Jan 9 '13 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to recompute A inside the j loop, take it outside.

Also, you don't need to redefine the function inside the loop everytime (assuming it doesn't depend on anything inside the loop).

n<- nrow (aa)
output <- matrix (0, n, n)
akl<- function (dii){
            ddi<- as.matrix (dii)
            m<- rowMeans(ddi)
            M<- mean(ddi)
            r<- sweep (ddi, 1, m)
            b<- sweep (r, 2, m)
            return (b + M)  
            }
for (i in 1:n)
{
    A<- akl(dist(aa[i,]))
    for (j in i:n)
    {
        B<- akl(dist(aa[j,]))
            V <- sqrt ((sqrt (mean(A * A))) * (sqrt(mean(B * B))))
        if (V > 0) {
            output[i,j] <- (sqrt(mean(A * B))) / V else output[i,j] <- 0
            }
    }
}   

Try that, run your tests (you have written tests, right?) and see.

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It works perfectly!!!!!!!!!!! :D very happy for! Thank you so much!!!!!!! :) –  Gabelins Jan 9 '13 at 16:54
    
I tried it on a pretty large test matrix (400x400). it's faster respect my script (takes half of the time that my script needs). The problem is that I've to use it on a 5000x700 matrix....it will take anyway to much time! Other improvments/advices? thanks –  Gabelins Jan 10 '13 at 9:42
    
For real speed, rewrite the whole thing in C or C++, and use RCpp. General guidelines on speeding things up in any programming language apply - write test cases, profile your code (see ?Rprofile), then optimise the bits that take the most time. –  Spacedman Jan 10 '13 at 9:52
1  
You can make more tiny changes (for example, sqrt(mean(A*A)) is constant in the j loop, so take that outside) but if you want order-of-magnitude speedups you need to rethink. –  Spacedman Jan 10 '13 at 9:53
    
Rethink in which sense? rewrite in C and use RCpp or other senses? –  Gabelins Jan 10 '13 at 10:54

Now that you've made the improvements in your code look into compiler package. By utilizing compiler with enablejit(3) you MAY shave some time off a script with a lot of looping.

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