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[Disclaimer - this code is simplified (a lot) to easy reading and I know it doesent conform to normal code standards]

My problem can bee seen in the code below. Basically I have a caller that parses in an object. I have to wait until a subcomponent is finished - which is signaled by an event - before returning a value from that that is based on some value on the subcomponent.

The question is: What is the preferred pattern for situations like this (of course an actual solution would be most welcome).

I've experimented with different stuff around TaskCompletionSource etc. but I'm afraid my understanding is lagging to much to find an (preferably) elegant solution. Hope you can help.

public class AsyncEventTest
{
    // This is performed one a single (UI) thread. The exception to this is
    // a.B that might - at the calling time - get a asycronious update from the backend.
    // The update is syncronized into the calling context so Task.Wait etc. will effectivly
    // deadlock the flow.
    public static string CallMe(A a)
    {
        if (a.B.State != State.Ready)
        {
            // wait for a.B.State == State.Ready ... but how ...
            // await MagicMethod() ???;
        }

        // only execute this code after a.b.State == State.Ready
        return a.B.Text;
    }
}

public class A
{
    public B B { get; set; }
}

public class B
{
    public State State { get; private set; }
    public event Action StateChanged;
    public string Text { get; }
}

public enum State { Ready, Working, }

EDIT - example of what I tried I wonder if something like this is an acceptable approach (or if it even works)?

public class AsyncEventTest2
{
    public static string CallMe(A a)
    {
        return CallMe1(a).Result;
    }

    public async static Task<string> CallMe1(A a)
    {
        await CallMe2(a);
        return a.B.Text;
    }

    public static Task CallMe2(A a)
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<string> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<string>();
        if (a.B.State != State.Ready)
        {
            a.B.StateChanged += () =>
                {
                    if (a.B.State == State.Ready)
                        tcs.SetResult(a.B.Text);
                };
        }
        else
        {
            tcs.SetResult(a.B.Text);
        }

        return tcs.Task;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Which classes are under your control? Ie which can you change? –  Henk Holterman Jan 9 '13 at 17:02
    
I control all of it. –  Moberg Jan 9 '13 at 17:04
    
Then replace the event with a WaitHandle (ManualResetEvent). –  Henk Holterman Jan 9 '13 at 17:06
    
Ok, that would require a lot of refactoring but I'll google it to find how it is used (still hoping for an alternative though). –  Moberg Jan 9 '13 at 17:08
    
where are you changing the state to Ready? –  Tilak Jan 9 '13 at 17:14

1 Answer 1

You can register for the StateChanged event and use a TaskCompletionSource.

public static Task WaitForReady(this B b)
{
    TaskCompletionSource<object> tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
    Action handler = null;
    handler = () =>
    {
        if (b.State == State.Ready)
        {
            b.StateChanged -= handler;
            tcs.SetResult(null);
        }
    };

    b.StateChanged += handler;
    return tcs.Task;
}

Beware there could be a race if the event could be raised before the handler is registered.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, it was something like this I had in mind - and then let the caller await it. –  Moberg Jan 9 '13 at 17:14
    
good point around the race but luckily I'm guarantied that this is running on a single thread. –  Moberg Jan 9 '13 at 17:16

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