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I'm trying to compile a linq query.

Func<ImportNewPermits_Enviance, String, EnumerableRowCollection<ImportNewPermits_Enviance._History_for_Permit__POI__Data_Row>> s_compiled =
    CompiledQuery.Compile<ImportNewPermits_Enviance, String, EnumerableRowCollection<ImportNewPermits_Enviance._History_for_Permit__POI__Data_Row>>(
        (ctx, poiName) => from r in ctx._History_for_Permit__POI__Data_
                          where r.POI_Name == poiName
                          select r);

Right now I'm facing the error There is no implicit reference conversion from ImportNewPermits_Enviance to System.Data.Objects.ObjectContext

The ImportsNewPermits_Enviance is the name of the typed DataSet.

How do I derive an ObjectContext from a typed DataSet

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1  
You don't. ObjectContext / CompiledQuery is part of Entity Framework, DataSet is part of classic ADO.NET. Two separate and mostly unrelated data access technologies. –  luksan Jan 9 '13 at 17:05
    
Well how can I compile a linq query that's querying a DataSet –  clarity Jan 9 '13 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

I don't see why you need to compile the query. If you're using Linq queries against a typed DataSet, that's a type of Linq To Objects query, meaning it's all executing in memory, which should be very fast. However, if you REALLY want to compile a Linq to Objects query, you can call AsQueryable() on the IEnumerable you're querying against and then store the resulting query for later evaluation. I believe this will cause Linq to Objects provider to compile the query, i.e.:

var compiledQuery = from r in _History_for_Permit__POI__Data_.AsQueryable()
                          where r.POI_Name == poiName
                          select r
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