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I'm having a hard time finding the words to describe my problem, so Google is not turning up any results. Sorry for what is (probably) a very simple question.

Basically I want to have two rows, both of which are created by individual between statements. I've tried using an "AS" statement like I would in a Select, but that just gives me a syntax error.

Here's my code:

Select      WEEK_ID,
            SUM (CUR_CHARGE_UNITS) as "Pro Units"
From        DW******.SLS****
Where       (WEEK_ID Between '201201' And '201252') --Use 'as' statement here?
            Or (WEEK_ID Between '201101' And '201152')
Group By    WEEK_ID

Basically I'm trying to figure out how to make

WEEK_ID Between '201201' And '201252'

collapse into one row titled "2012". Like I said, all I've tried is

(WEEK_ID Between '201201' And '201252) As "2012"

Any thoughts? Any tutorials anyone wants to point me at? Any insults for not knowing the answer to a presumably basic question?

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something like group by substr(week_id, 0, 4), whatever your db's equivalent of the substring function is? –  Marc B Jan 9 '13 at 17:00
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try taking the first 4 characters and grouping by that instead:

Select      LEFT(WEEK_ID,4) AS Year,
            SUM (CUR_CHARGE_UNITS) as "Pro Units"
From        DW******.SLS****
Where       (WEEK_ID Between '201201' And '201252') --Use 'as' statement here?
            Or (WEEK_ID Between '201101' And '201152')
Group By    LEFT(WEEK_ID,4)

The benefit is that LEFT is ANSI so should work in all rdbms

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1  
+1 . . . But you should really called left(week_id, 4) year and not week. –  Gordon Linoff Jan 9 '13 at 17:01
    
Is OP actually asking about substringing? It looks to me like he wants to alias a set of columns. –  Woot4Moo Jan 9 '13 at 17:04
    
This solution actually gets the job done. It doesn't do it in the way I would have preferred, but no matter :-). –  Jay Carr Jan 9 '13 at 17:10
    
I read the line - collapse into one row titled "2012" - as meaning he only wants one row for 2012 rather than a separate column to indicate the year –  twoleggedhorse Jan 9 '13 at 17:11
    
And you would be right. One row for 2011 one for 2012. –  Jay Carr Jan 9 '13 at 17:13
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Sounds like you need a case statement

http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/dzichelp/v2r2/index.jsp?topic=%2Fcom.ibm.db2.doc.sqlref%2Fpsmcse.htm

select
    case when week_id between '201201' and '201252'
              then '2012'
          when week_id between '201101' and '201152'
              then '2011'
     end as 'year'
        SUM (CUR_CHARGE_UNITS) as "Pro Units"
From        DW******.SLS****
Where       (WEEK_ID Between '201201' And '201252')
        Or (WEEK_ID Between '201101' And '201152')
Group By 
     case when week_id between '201201' and '201252'
              then '2012'
          when week_id between '201101' and '201152'
              then '2011'
     end
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I'm not terribly familiar with Case statements in SQL. I think I'll need to read into this as it probably would prove useful. –  Jay Carr Jan 9 '13 at 17:12
1  
You can group by a case statement if it's in your select but don't use an alias in the grouping.. SELECT CASE x END AS 'Year' FROM y GROUP BY CASE x END. CASE is not ANSI though so you'll have to check with your RDBMS vendor first –  twoleggedhorse Jan 9 '13 at 17:17
    
CASE here is splitting the values into new columns rather than rows as the question asks for. –  WarrenT Jan 9 '13 at 23:10
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In terms of "any thoughts", I would suggest that you simply study the GROUP BY clause and the concept of SQL aggregates.

If you want to aggregate all weeks of the year, then you don't want to select or group by WEEK_ID (you'll want to group by year).

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