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I have a base class ShapeManager with a list of shapes which I want to enumerate(). Then there is a specialization ColoredShapeManager which wants to process specialized ColoredShapes instead of Shapes:

+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+
| Shape          |      | ShapeManager                        |
|----------------|      |-------------------------------------|
| + id: int      |      | # shapes: List<Shape>               |
|                |      |                                     |
|                |      | + ShapeManager() {                  |
|                |      |     shapes.add(new Shape());        |
|                |      |   }                                 |
|                |      |                                     |
|                |      | + abstract void enumerate() {       |
|                |      |     for (Shape s: shapes) {         |
|                |      |        // use s                     |
|                |      |     }                               |
|                |      |   }                                 |
+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+
         ^                              ^
         |                              |
         +                              +
+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+
| ColoredShape   |      | ColoredShapeManager                 |
|----------------|      |-------------------------------------|
| + color: int   |      | + ColoredShapeManager() {           |
|                |      |     shapes.add(new ColoredShape()); |
|                |      |   }                                 |
|                |      |                                     |
|                |      | + abstract void enumerate() {       |
|                |      |     for (Shape s: shapes) {         |
|                |      |       // use (ColoredShaped) s      |
|                |      |       // will fail for Shapes       |
|                |      |     }                               |
|                |      |   }                                 |
+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+

I am unsure whether ShapeManager should share shapes: List<Shape> with its children This seems flawed since ColoredShapeManager.enumerate() wants to process ColoredShapes. Hence it would cast the elements, yet some elements (those added by the base class) are of type Shape and the cast would fail.

That is:

  • Both types of shape end up in the list shapes.
  • enumerate() in the child manager should have access to ColoredShape.

Should I rather split the list and create private lists in each of the two managers? Then enumerate in the child would only iterate over "its" type of shapes and call the parent's enumerate() at the start/end.

share|improve this question
    
asciiflow.com/#Draw great tool! –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 21 '13 at 16:25
    
The best solution depends on what you are doing with shapes. For example, if you are going to draw the shapes in the loop in 'enumerate' (which is a poor name choice for the code you show, in my opinion), if you are going to draw, then all shapes--colored and not-- will have a draw method. The mixture of calling methods on the 'Shape' class, that apply to all instances, and calling methods on the 'ColoredShape' class, that don't apply to 'Shape' instances, that mixture may determine the best way to do this. –  Lee Meador Jan 21 '13 at 18:20
    
The whole point of the question is how to use ColoredShape specific functions/properties (that is color in this example). –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 22 '13 at 6:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

Why not separate out the behaviour and generify the container ?

container:

public class ShapeManager<T extends Shape> {
    private List<T> shapeList;

    public void processShapes(ShapeProcessor processor){
        for (T shape : shapeList){
            processor.process(shape);
        }
    }
}

and behaviour (you also can have a factory class to provide different implementations):

public class ShapeProcessor {

    public void process(Shape shape) {

    }

    public void process(ColoredShape shape){

    }
}

Or, go into full Visitor Pattern:

public abstract class Shape {
    public void accept(ShapeProcessor processor){
        processor.process(this);
    }
}

public interface ShapeProcessor {
    public void process(Shape shape);
    public void process(ColoredShape shape);
}

public class ShapeManager {
    private List<Shape> shapeList;

    public void processShapes(ShapeProcessor processor){
        for (Shape shape : shapeList){
            shape.accept(processor);
        }
    }
}

This allows multiple kind of shapes to be enumerated and have different kinds of process methods applied, that too from different kinds of ShapeProcessors. Manager doesn't cares about any of them.

share|improve this answer
    
So basically what I said yesterday ;) –  TedTrippin Jan 16 '13 at 14:04
    
The only drawback I see is that I have to foresee all future *Shape classes in order to define ShapeProcessor. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 22 '13 at 7:26
    
@MichaWiedenmann Not exactly, you don't have to place all kind of process() methods in same class, 1. You could pass a ProcessorProvider (a factory) to return an appropriate processor. 2. As shown in visitor pattern for every new Shape class , simply build a companion class that implements ShapeProcessor Interface. –  S.D. Jan 22 '13 at 12:39

You can add the shape type as the "type parameter" for your manager classes. So basically, ColoredShapeManager can extend ShapeManager<ColoredShape> and this T will be the type of your internal List data structure. Also, if your ColoredShapeManager doesn't do anything specific with the ColoredShapes, I would argue that it doesn't even need a new class. But then again it depends on the way you are structuring your app/design.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I have updated my question to make it more clear. I want to use ShapeManager as a Base class. I think I can't do as you suggested if I later inherite from ColoredShapeManager too (since this child would extend the base rather than the first child). I also think that the type parameter is an implementation detail and shouldn't be published as part of the type of ShapeManager. Maybe using a class instead of an interface is a mistake done by me. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 10 '13 at 10:28
    
I see your point, but exposing the type parameter should not violate encapsulation. After all, you are exposing it in the class name. You could use parameter <T extends Shape> to restrict the class to only using shapes -- this is actually recommended to ensure that you are indeed processing Shapes. –  MathSquared Jan 19 '13 at 21:30

Would the visitor pattern suit you here?

Shape

public void doSomething(ShapeManager) {
    ...
}

ShapeManager

abstract void enumerate() {
   for (Shape shape: shapes) {
       shape.doSomething(this);
   }
}

Then you wouldnt need to know the type and each shape derivative could have its own implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I have awarded Singularity because his answer was easier to understand for me, yet I am still grateful to you and all people that helped me. I hope this is fine with you. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 22 '13 at 8:28

I think you can use generic in ShapeManager. I would borrow your class diagrams if you don't mind:

+----------------+      +---------------------------------------+        +------------------------------+
| Shape          |      | AbstractShapeManager<S extends Shape> |        | ShapeManager<Shape>          |
|----------------|      |---------------------------------------|        |------------------------------|
| + id: int      |      | # shapes: List<S>                     |        | + Shape() {                  |
|                |      |                                       |        |     shapes.add(new Shape()); |
|                |      | + abstract void enumerate() {         | < —— + |   }                          |
|                |      |     for (S s: shapes) {               |        |                              |
|                |      |        /* use s */                    |        | + void enumerate() {         |
|                |      |     }                                 |        |     for (Shape s: shapes) {  |
|                |      |   }                                   |        |       // use Shape           |
+----------------+      +---------------------------------------+        |     }                        |
         ^                              ^                                |   }                          |
         |                              |                                +------------------------------+
         +                              +
+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+
| ColoredShape   |      | ColoredShapeManager<ColoredShape>   |
|----------------|      |-------------------------------------|
| + color: int   |      | + ColoredShapeManager() {           |
|                |      |     shapes.add(new ColoredShape()); |
|                |      |   }                                 |
|                |      |                                     |
|                |      | + void enumerate() {                |
|                |      |     for (ColoredShape s: shapes) {  |
|                |      |       // use ColoredShape           |
|                |      |     }                               |
|                |      |   }                                 |
+----------------+      +-------------------------------------+

In this way, the drawback is you can't add any Shape to the list because there is a type restriction.

share|improve this answer

I think the problem is that you are constructing a single attribute - the list shapes - in two places: partly in the parent and partly in the child class. This is obviously not a good design. You need to change it. Although I can't say exactly how, but I think one solution can be that you provide the list as an argument to constructors (at least for the parent constructor), instead of creating them inside each constructor. That way, when you are using a child class such as ColoredShapeManager, you can construct a list of ColoredShapes, and pass it to parent constructor from within child constructor. That way, in all your child methods you will be dealing with only, ColoredShape. While, if you are using parent, there will only be Shapes (passed through constructor).

share|improve this answer
    
I should have said more clearly that Base can add elements in other member functions too. Those can't be casted in the child. –  Micha Wiedenmann Jan 10 '13 at 8:57

Your design could work but you would have to check at runtime whether the shape s is indeed a shape or if it is a ColoredShape using the instanceOf(class) instruction. Doing so can get messy if you start adding a lot of different types of shapes. The right way to do it would be to define an interface which each shapes would implement, this way each shape could be used in a same way.

Why not using the composite pattern ?

public interface IShape { public int enumerate(); }


public class Shape implements IShape {

int id;

public int enumerate() {
    return id;
}

}

public class ShapeColor extends shape {

    int color;

    public int enumerate() {

        return //whatever you need;
    }

}

import java.util.List;

public class ShapeManager implements IShape {

    List<IShape> shapes;

    public int enumerate() {
        for(IShape s : shapes){
            //do stuff
        }
        return 0;
    }

}

By doing like so you take the behavior you wanted to add in ColoredShapeManager and directly put it in the ColoredShape (which seems more logical)

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