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I want to have a protected field that is strongly typed as a nested class's subtype. Specifically, this is what I want to do although it does not compile:

public class MyClass1<T>
    where T : MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a
{
    protected class MyClass1a { }
    protected T myClass1aOrSubtype;
}

public class MyClass2 : MyClass1<MyClass2.MyClass2a>
{
    protected class MyClass2a : MyClass1a { }
}

Apparently, type constraints on a public type's type parameters must also be public. This would make sense to me if MyClass1<T> publicly exposes a member of type T, or if MyClass2 publicly exposes a member of type MyClass2a. But they don't, yet it still doesn't compile.

What is the reasoning behind this? I mean, why did the language designers decide to restrict this as such? Any interesting workarounds to suggest?

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closed as not constructive by Jon B, Mario, CoolBeans, Pondlife, Soner Gönül Jan 9 '13 at 22:03

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3 Answers 3

Just make MyClass2a public. You can't use MyClass2.MyClass2a as generic type parameter because is less accessable than MyClass2. Your class is public, but generic type is protected and inaccessable from external code.

It compiles, but looks like strange and difficult to understand constuction.

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The access modifiers on my question's code sample are how they should be for my situation. You mention the compiler error but that's not an answer. The question was: what is the justification? –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 17:47
    
I think it is the same reason why we can't inherit from less accessible classes or pass less accessible classes as method parameters. We can't operate with less accessible on higher accessibility level. Without this rule private, protected, internal keywords would not make sense. Everyone would be able to expose less accessible classes. –  Alexander Balte Jan 9 '13 at 18:26
    
My question notes that the less accessible type is not exposed on a public member, so this is not an issue. –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 18:30
public class MyClass1<T>
    where T : MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a
{
    protected class MyClass1a { }
    protected T myClass1aOrSubtype;
}

MyClass1<T> is public. If above code block compiles, How object will be created in other assemblies.

   MyClass1<"How to define this type in other assembly. As a constraint It must be derived from MyClass1a which is not visible">
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MyClass2 could just as well be in another assembly. MyClass1a IS visible in other assemblies, within a subtype of MyClass1<T>. –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 17:54
    
No, another MyClass2 will not be same as the one defined in the constrain. Classes are internally identified with token id. Token id will be different for classes with same name/namespaces in different assemblies. –  Tilak Jan 9 '13 at 17:56
    
Could you explain this more? I don't understand how it applies to the question. –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 18:02
    
In where T : MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a, MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a is not visible outside the MyClass1<T> class (leave derived types for now, they cannot increase access modifier of base class members). To create an object of MyClass<T>, an object that extends MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a is needed. var obj = new MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a() is needed which is illegal outside MyClass1<T> –  Tilak Jan 9 '13 at 18:12
    
There is no need for the derived type to "increase access modifier of base class" as you say. It IS legal within MyClass2. –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 18:27

What is the reasoning behind this?

You've made MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a protected, which means it's not visible outside the class or it's inheitors, but yet made the generic parameter depend on that type. Even though the usage of that type is not public there's no way to define an instance of that class without exposing that protected inner class.

In other words, how can T inherit from MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a when MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a is protected?

Apparently, type constraints on a public type's type parameters must also be public

That is true, because the type contraints cannot be less accessible than the type. If MyClass1<T>.MyClass1a was internal then MyClass1<T> could be internal as well. But then neither could be used outside of the assembly.

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Thanks but looks like you just rephrased my question without answering it. Why shouldn't there be a "way to define an instance of that class without exposing that protected inner class"? In what practical situations would that cause a problem? Or is it just a theoretical principal that they decided to adhere to? –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 17:34
    
Your argument was that since T is not used in any public methods it should compile; I'm saying that you cannot define T because it depends on a class that is not public. –  D Stanley Jan 9 '13 at 21:26
    
This is getting to the heart of the matter. Now my question is: what is the language design justification for the restriction that "you cannot define T because it depends on a class that is not public" even though "T is not used in any public methods"? –  HappyNomad Jan 9 '13 at 22:18

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