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I'm a complete beginner in CSS (this is literally the first CSS I've written) and relatively beginner in HTML, so please forgive me if I'm missing something obvious or if I have done some grave mistake. Now, to the problem:

I'm trying to create a layout and I've stumbled upon an issue that forbids me from doing what I want. Here's a screenshot of what I have:

The layout as it currently is.

What I want to do is simply take the div that reads "home", "blog", etc and make it as wide as the divs below, effectively making it end at the same Y as the sidebar. Like so:

What I want to achieve.

The body of the HTML file contains an background class div, that takes care of the decoration text, while everything that's not there is in another div called container. container is set to display: table and inside it contains two divs of class row (marking a display: table-row), the first containing the navigation div and the second containing the main and sidebar ones (all of them being of class section, marked display: table-cell).

Here's the whole file, to show both the CSS is and how I've attempted to structure the HTML:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">


<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="en-US">


<head>
    <title>mini</title>
    <style type="text/css">

        * {
            font-family: "Ubuntu", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
            margin: 0;
        }

        body {
            padding: 100px 0 0 0;           
            background: white;
            color: #444444;
        }

        h1 {
            font-size: 48px;
            font-weight: bold;
            letter-spacing: -0.083333em;
            line-height: 1.3em;
            text-transform: lowercase;
        }

        p {
            line-height: 1.5em;
        }

        .container {
            overflow: hidden;
            padding: 24px 24px 24px 24px;
            border-spacing: 35px 35px;
            display: table;
        }

        .section {
            position: relative;
            padding: 24px 24px 24px 24px;
            border-width: 1px;
            border-style: solid;
            border-color: #888888;
            background: white;
            display: table-cell;
        }

        .background {
            position: absolute;
            margin: -124px -124px -124px -124px;
            z-index: -1;
            float: right;
            font-size: 54px;
            line-height: 1em;
            font-weight: bold;
            color: #eeeeee;
        }

        .row {          
            display: table-row;
        }

        #sidebar {
            width: 20%;
        }

        #navigation {
            font-size: 24px;
            font-weight: bold;
            text-transform: lowercase;
        }

        #empty {
        }

    </style>
</head>



<body>
    <div id="background" class="background">
        bgtext
    </div>

    <div id="foreground" class="container">
        <div class="row">
            <div id="navigation" class="section">
                navitext
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="row">
            <div id="mainbody" class="section">
                <h1>Main</h1>
                maintext
            </div>
            <div id="sidebar" class="section">
                <h1>Sidebar</h1>
                sidetext
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>

</html>
share|improve this question
1  
diplay: table type styles mean your CSS is going to act like a table. Which likely isn't what you want here. –  DA. Jan 9 '13 at 21:47
    
I'm starting to suspect that. But if there was some way to just define the navigation to span two columns, I suppose we'd be getting somewhere. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 9 '13 at 21:59

3 Answers 3

One way to achieve this is to create a wrapper around all content:

#wrapper {
   width:960px;
   position: relative;
}

<div id="wrapper">

   <div id="header">Header</div>

   <! -- Other content related divs goes here -->

</div>

The header div will now take as much space as it can get, namely 960px. The same will apply to other divs inside the wrapper div, unless otherwise specified (which is what you are looking for).

You probably want to center this div through margin: 0 auto to make your website look good on bigger screens.

Best of luck :-)

share|improve this answer
    
It's a little unclear to me. Could you let me know by id which divs in the HTML I should wrap with wrapper? I tried a few combinations but it didn't have the result I expected. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 9 '13 at 18:00
    
@TheodorosChatzigiannakis Take a look at this example, it should give you a good idea on how to get started: jsfiddle.net/Y4kGb/4 –  Zar Jan 9 '13 at 18:43

I'm not completely certain what you're trying to do, but I think you mean that you want equal spacing between the anchors in your navbar. In that case, there's no JavaScript necessary.

I would use centered inline-blocks for that with spacers on either side so that the distance between each link is the same as the padding to the border.

See code:

<!-- In style: -->
...
#navigation > .spacer {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 5%;
    float: left;
}

#navigation > .navLink {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 22.5%;
    float: left;
    text-align: center;
}
...

...
<!-- Nav bar div -->
<div id="navigation" class="section">
    <div class="spacer">
        &nbsp;
    </div>
    <div class="navLink">
        link1
    </div>
    <div class="navLink">
        link2
    </div>
    <div class="navLink">
        link3
    </div>
    <div class="navLink">
        link4
    </div>
    <div class="spacer">
        &nbsp;
    </div>
</div>
...

Format as desired and enjoy your new navigation bar!
Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you, this is something I did want to add, but not the answer to the question. The question is about extending the navigation bar's border to match the end of the sidebar's border. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 9 '13 at 21:26

You have no need for the display: table or display:table-cell, because It is not good practice to use this for template designs. If you want to give padding to the cells then it is necessary to minimize the width of that element respecitvely. The following may help you.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">


<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="en-US">


<head>
    <title>mini</title>
    <style type="text/css">

        * {
            font-family: "Ubuntu", Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
            margin: 0;
        }

        body {
            padding: 100px 0 0 0;           
            background: white;
            color: #444444;
        }

        #wrapper{
            width:80%;
            margin:auto;
        }

        #main{
            width:100%;
        }

        #navigation{
            border:black 1px solid;
            float:left;
            width:96%;
            padding:2%;
            margin-bottom:20px;
        }

        #mainbody{

            border:black 1px solid;
            float:left;
            width:75%;

            height:auto;
        }

         #sidebar{
            border:black 1px solid;
            float:right;
            width:23%;

            height:100%;

        }

    </style>
</head>



<body>
    <div id="wrapper">
        <div id="navigation">
            Home | blog | forum | about
        </div>

        <div id="main">
            <div id="mainbody">
                 <h1>Main</h1>
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br />
                    maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext maintext
                    <br /><br />

            </div>
            <div id="sidebar">
                side bar
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>
</body>

</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to use JavaScript in this particular layout. That being said, I tried your second approach and it didn't seem to have the result I had in mind. It's likely that I didn't apply it correctly somehow (even though you've been clear enough in your answer). Could you use the HTML I've attached to apply your solution, so that I can see exactly what you mean? I've also attached a screen shot of what I'm trying to achieve, in case my description doesn't help. (By the way, I didn't downvote you.) –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 9 '13 at 21:50
    
Any reason for making the div display: table and display:table-cell? –  Tariq Aziz Jan 10 '13 at 13:43
    
I wanted to make the main and sidebar divs appear side by side and by Googling, this was the first method I found. Have I misunderstood its purpose? –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jan 10 '13 at 13:46

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