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I have a c#.net wpf application which sends data to a webservice on daily basis. I am planning to host my webservice on shared hosting.

My question is How to ensure my webservice is always up and running ? i.e What should I need to take care if my webserver is down for few days? Do I need to maintain multiple servers if one goes down another will be available ? To acheive this do I need to mention both the servers ip addresses in wpf windows application?

I have searched google but couldnt find the correct answer. Any links from the community will be appreciated.

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Is this a WCF service, or a legacy ASMX service? –  John Saunders Jan 9 '13 at 18:17
    
This is simple asmx service. –  sateesh munagala Jan 10 '13 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

i have two suggestions: 1. call a method of web service method and handle it with exception. 2. get the dynamic URL from section <applicationSettings> and then do a httprequest to check if url is valid or not

solution 1 example:

[WebMethod]
public DateTime GetCurrentServerTime()
{
     return System.DateTime.UtcNow.ToString("yyyyMMddZHHmmss");
}

and in you application :

catch (System.Net.WebException ex)
{

messgabebox.show( "Your Web Service not available");
}

it cause about 10 seconds for a response ....

solution 2 example:

HttpWebRequest objRequest = (System.Net.HttpWebRequest)HttpWebRequest.Create(strWebServiceUrl);
HttpWebResponse myHttpWebResponse = (HttpWebResponse)objRequest.GetResponse();

if (myHttpWebResponse.StatusCode != HttpStatusCode.OK)
{

DisplayMessage("Your Web Service not available" + "\r" + "Please try after some time");

return;
}

I think this is the better way to check for webservice availability..

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The reason you haven't found an answer on google is that there is no correct answer. Everyone approaches these problems differently based on the needs of their application. To answer some of your questions, I can really only provide general suggestions and even those are just approaches I would take to solving this problem:

My question is How to ensure my webservice is always up and running ?

Maximizing uptime is important and can require careful design. You need to gracefully handle error conditions and be able to handle any input thrown at you. One caveat with this is that, while uptime is important, accuracy of your data may be more important. If this is the case, it may be better for your webservice to be down, than to appear to be up, but have it corrupting data.

What should I need to take care if my webserver is down for few days?

You need to code your client application in such a way that it can properly queue data up and send it when the service is back up. Also, you need to be smart in your service (i.e. not assuming that upload data == data date). Don't forget that the client application can be down for days at a time too (natural disaster, power outage, downtime for maintenace, crashing on a weekend...)

Do I need to maintain multiple servers if one goes down another will be available ?

To acheive this do I need to mention both the servers ip addresses in wpf windows application?`

That is definitely an option. Redundancy can allow you to perform maintenance on servers or upgrade while minimizing downtime. There are a lot of ways to approach this. I would probably use multiple FQDNs. So I would have server1.example.com and server2.example.com each pointing to a different server (ideally in a different data center). I would also have these servers have a very low TTL on their DNS entries, so I can swap out the servers to a new IP if they start going down.

Then in your client app, you can either round robin between the two servers or you can have a main server and the other just serves as a backup.

With all of that being said, the point many people forget about when setting something like this up is testing. You need to test one server coming down, both servers coming down, switching DNS and any other permutations you can think of to ensure your redundancy solution works, is scalable, and doesn't cause other issues.

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Thanks for your answer .I will implement your techniques. –  sateesh munagala Jan 12 '13 at 18:21

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