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I have a database table as described below. It is happens it is supporting a Java EE discriminator entity with multiple forms, but I don't think this important to this question, I provide the information for completeness.

Rows in the table can take a number of forms, and which fields are allowed to be null and which must be non-null is defined by the value of the 'type' column. In this case, for example, when type = 'sail' the eShip and ePort columns should be non-null and eShip, ePort & eDate should be unique.

Is there a way of writing constraints to support this? The one I'm really after is the uniqueness constraint for eShip, ePort & eDate when `type = 'sail' but doesn't mind their being multiple rows with them all null when 'type' is some other value?

The other way of doing this is to split the table into two, one table holding the common columns, and a table for the 'sail' specific stuff. But I would like to avoid this if I can because it makes the database selects easier to write when I'm searching the database by hand.

Many thanks for any advice or help you can provide.

mysql> desc vLegs;
+---------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field   | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+---------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| type    | varchar(10)  | NO   |     | NULL    |                | 
| id      | mediumint(9) | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment | 
| end     | datetime     | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| start   | datetime     | NO   |     | NULL    |                | 
| flight  | varchar(255) | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| oprtv   | mediumint(9) | NO   | MUL | NULL    |                | 
| dDate   | date         | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                | 
| dPort   | varchar(5)   | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| dShip   | varchar(10)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| eDate   | date         | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                | 
| ePort   | varchar(5)   | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| eShip   | varchar(10)  | YES  |     | NULL    |                | 
| landing | varchar(5)   | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                | 
| takeoff | varchar(5)   | YES  | MUL | NULL    |                | 
+---------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
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"Optional Constraints" — a bit of an oxymoron. Having a type field in a database seems like bad design to me, "because it makes the database selects easier to write" should not be a driving factor behind database design. Get a good ORM if you have to. –  Waleed Khan Jan 9 '13 at 17:35
    
@WaleedKhan: a "good ORM" is also a bit of an oxymoron ;) –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 9 '13 at 20:37

1 Answer 1

Based on what you have described regarding your requirements, I suggest that you create one table per type. I do not know enough about mysql to determine whether what you are trying to do is possible with constraints. Even if it is possible, it sounds difficult to understand and maintain.

Perhaps a view would help the use case when you have to write SQL by hand.

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