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I'm writing HFT trading software. I do care about every single microsecond. Now it written on C# but i will migrate to C++ soon.

Let's consider such code

// Original
class Foo {
....

    // method is called from one thread only so no need to be thread-safe
    public void FrequentlyCalledMethod() {
        var actions = new List<Action>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            actions.Add(new Action(....));
        }
        // use actions, synchronous
        executor.Execute(actions);
        // now actions can be deleted
    }

I guess that ultra-low latency software should not use "new" keyword too much, so I moved actions to be a field:

// Version 1
class Foo {
....

    private List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();

    // method is called from one thread only so no need to be thread-safe
    public void FrequentlyCalledMethod() {
        actions.Clear()
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            actions.Add(new Action { type = ActionType.AddOrder; price = 100 + i; });
        }
        // use actions, synchronous
        executor.Execute(actions);
        // now actions can be deleted
    }

And probably I should try to avoid "new" keyword at all? I can use some "pool" of pre-allocated objects:

// Version 2
class Foo {
....

    private List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();
    private Action[] actionPool = new Action[10];

    // method is called from one thread only so no need to be thread-safe
    public void FrequentlyCalledMethod() {
        actions.Clear()
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            var action = actionsPool[i];
            action.type = ActionType.AddOrder;
            action.price = 100 + i;
            actions.Add(action);
        }
        // use actions, synchronous
        executor.Execute(actions);
        // now actions can be deleted
    }
  • How far should I go?
  • How important to avoid new?
  • Will I win anything while using preallocated object which I only need to configure? (set type and price in example above)

Please note that this is ultra-low latency so let's assume that performance is preferred against readability maintainability etc. etc.

share|improve this question
7  
If it's that important, who are you gonna trust: People on the internet, or scientific benchmarks? –  delnan Jan 9 '13 at 17:37
2  
@delnan i do trust people on stackoverflow :) –  javapowered Jan 9 '13 at 17:38
5  
I would try both and make measurements. –  dmaij Jan 9 '13 at 17:39
    
Memory allocation can be slow, but it doesn't have to be. –  Chad Jan 9 '13 at 17:40
1  
Please don't trust SO for this kind of thing haha but in our financial application, we've essentially pre-allocated huge chunks of memory, written a custom "memory manager", and "allocated" our new objects in this space. –  im so confused Jan 9 '13 at 17:40
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4 Answers

In C++ you don't need new to create an object that has limited scope.

void FrequentlyCalledMethod() 
{
    std::vector<Action> actions;
    actions.reserve( 10 );
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) 
    {
        actions.push_back( Action(....) );
    }
    // use actions, synchronous
    executor.Execute(actions);
    // now actions can be deleted
}

If Action is a base class and the actual types you have are of a derived class, you will need a pointer or smart pointer and new here. But no need if Action is a concrete type and all the elements will be of this type, and if this type is default-constructible, copyable and assignable.

In general though, it is highly unlikely that your performance benefits will come from not using new. It is just good practice here in C++ to use local function scope when that is the scope of your object. This is because in C++ you have to take more care of resource management, and that is done with a technique known as "RAII" - which essentially means taking care of how a resource will be deleted (through a destructor of an object) at the point of allocation.

High performance is more likely to come about through:

  • proper use of algorithms
  • proper parallel-processing and synchronisation techniques
  • effective caching and lazy evaluation.
share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by "effective caching"? are you talking about processor cache? I almost do not use parallel processing and synchronization. I almost use single thread for the 80% of the job, as I want to have job done in less than 100 microseconds, and probaly much less than 100 microseconds. will it be faster to use "concrete type" or use "preallocated object that only need to be configured"? –  javapowered Jan 9 '13 at 18:00
    
put it this way, if it turns out using new or not (on hot code), has little impact on your performance, then your program is too slow. –  arrows Jan 9 '13 at 18:07
    
both your own caching, and also ensuring that some operations ensure proper processor caching. We've had topics before about different collection sizes giving stark contrast in speed. –  CashCow Jan 10 '13 at 15:36
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As much as I detest HFT, I'm going to tell you how to get maximum performance out of each thread on a given piece of iron.

Here's an explanation of an example where a program as originally written was made 730 times faster.

You do it in stages. At each stage, you find something that takes a good percentage of time, and you fix it. The keyword is find, as opposed to guess. Too many people just eyeball the code, and fix what they think will help, and often but not always it does help, some. That's guesswork. To get real speedup, you need to find all the problems, not just the few you can guess.

If your program is doing new, then chances are at some point that will be what you need to fix. But it's not the only thing.

Here's the theory behind it.

share|improve this answer
    
i agree, but this is not an answer for my question. thanks for a link it's very interesting. –  javapowered Jan 9 '13 at 19:13
    
@javapowered: It says chances are new will be a problem, but not the only one. One of the things I do is pool recycled objects. –  Mike Dunlavey Jan 9 '13 at 19:32
add comment

For high-performance trading engines at good HFT shops, avoiding new/malloc in C++ code is a basic.

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add comment

How far should I go?

to the end of the universe. it is vitally important not to use new in hot code, if you call yourself HFT.

How important to avoid new?

avoid like the plague, things like malloc or new should only be in the initialization phase or non-critical code path.

Will I win anything while using preallocated object which I only need to configure?

good: no dynamic allocation at runtime.

good: better cache behavior as your buffer chunked together and same memory location reused

bad: it can cause very subtle bugs when a memory location is reused for different objects and they can step onto each others' toes.

bad: sometime it is hard to predict the total size of the preallocation, and increase the buffer size dynamically can be a big hassle

share|improve this answer
    
i don't know why this was downvoted. this is all true –  im so confused Jan 9 '13 at 18:21
1  
This is all true in C++, where allocating an object with new is expensive as it needs to find a hole in memory to place the object(s). In C# allocating a new object is fast, and constant in time, as there is only one hole, so the heap pointer just needs to be moved up. The "expensive" part of allocating a new object is the periodic garbage collection and defragmenting. Note that if the object goes out of scope by the start of the next GC collection then it won't make that collection any slower; the collection phase finds all alive objects and saves them, discarding all else. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 19:04
    
@Servy ah, did not know that about C#. Good to know, thanks! Regardless, OP states he will be migrating to C++ soon, and I think this is valuable information in such a case. not to mention at the time this was made, the question was also tagged C++ –  im so confused Jan 9 '13 at 19:14
    
It isn't all true. Much of it is premature optimisation. You can't manage without dynamic allocation of objects and memory. C# is not more efficient, it only calls the same routines under the covers. –  CashCow Jan 10 '13 at 15:39
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