Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While looking around for a while I found quite a few discussions on how to figure out the number of lines in a file.

For example these three:
c# how do I count lines in a textfile
Determine the number of lines within a text file
How to count lines fast?

So, I went ahead and ended up using what seems to be the most efficient (at least memory-wise?) method that I could find:

private static int countFileLines(string filePath)
{
    using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader(filePath))
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (r.ReadLine() != null) 
        { 
            i++; 
        }
        return i;
    }
}

But this takes forever when the lines themselves from the file are very long. Is there really not a faster solution to this?

I've been trying to use StreamReader.Read() or StreamReader.Peek() but I can't (or don't know how to) make the either of them move on to the next line as soon as there's 'stuff' (chars? text?).

Any ideas please?


CONCLUSION/RESULTS (After running some tests based on the answers provided):

I tested the 5 methods below on two different files and I got consistent results that seem to indicate that plain old StreamReader.ReadLine() is still one of the fastest ways... To be honest, I'm perplexed after all the comments and discussion in the answers.

File #1:
Size: 3,631 KB
Lines: 56,870

Results in seconds for File #1:
0.02 --> ReadLine method.
0.04 --> Read method.
0.29 --> ReadByte method.
0.25 --> Readlines.Count method.
0.04 --> ReadWithBufferSize method.

File #2:
Size: 14,499 KB
Lines: 213,424

Results in seconds for File #1:
0.08 --> ReadLine method.
0.19 --> Read method.
1.15 --> ReadByte method.
1.02 --> Readlines.Count method.
0.08 --> ReadWithBufferSize method.

Here are the 5 methods I tested based on all the feedback I received:

private static int countWithReadLine(string filePath)
{
    using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader(filePath))
    {
    int i = 0;
    while (r.ReadLine() != null)
    {
        i++;
    }
    return i;
    }
}

private static int countWithRead(string filePath)
{
    using (StreamReader _reader = new StreamReader(filePath))
    {
    int c = 0, count = 0;
    while ((c = _reader.Read()) != -1)
    {
        if (c == 10)
        {
        count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
    }            
}

private static int countWithReadByte(string filePath)
{
    using (Stream s = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open))
    {
    int i = 0;
    int b;

    b = s.ReadByte();
    while (b >= 0)
    {
        if (b == 10)
        {
        i++;
        }
        b = s.ReadByte();
    }
    return i;
    }
}

private static int countWithReadLinesCount(string filePath)
{
    return File.ReadLines(filePath).Count();
}

private static int countWithReadAndBufferSize(string filePath)
{
    int bufferSize = 512;

    using (Stream s = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open))
    {
    int i = 0;
    byte[] b = new byte[bufferSize];
    int n = 0;

    n = s.Read(b, 0, bufferSize);
    while (n > 0)
    {
        i += countByteLines(b, n);
        n = s.Read(b, 0, bufferSize);
    }
    return i;
    }
}

private static int countByteLines(byte[] b, int n)
{
    int i = 0;
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
    {
    if (b[j] == 10)
    {
        i++;
    }
    }

    return i;
}
share|improve this question
    
how would read() or peek() know where the next line is in the stream? –  John Jan 9 '13 at 17:48
    
@John By looking for \n and \r characters. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 17:54
    
Does each line have exactly the same number of bytes, or almost exactly? If they're exact you could just count the file size, and if they're close you could come up with a close approximation based on the average line length. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 17:57
    
I was referring to the comment regarding having the stream jump forward –  John Jan 9 '13 at 17:59
    
@John: Thanks, John. Your answer(?) helps me realize I'm looking in the wrong spot, even if you meant it to be sarcastic. –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 18:34

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, it is not. Point is - it materializes the strings, which is not needed.

To COUNT it you are much better off to ignore the "string" Part and to go the "line" Part.

a LINE is a seriees of bytes ending with \r\n (13, 10 - CR LF) or another marker.

Just run along the bytes, in a buffered stream, counting the number of appearances of your end of line marker.

share|improve this answer
1  
Could you elaborate a bit more with some sample code? Thank you! –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 17:53
1  
You think this is school homework? C'mon... –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 17:58
1  
If it is not school or other trainee homework, you are wrong in programming. THis IS the level of a "introduction into programming" test. –  TomTom Jan 9 '13 at 18:11
3  
I guess I'm at that level in this regard, and I don't take offense. I'm not looking for 'free lunch' here, I just don't like it when people just judge you without knowing the full story. I do appreciate your 'answer' and will absolutely use it to my advantage while I keep trying to figure this out... with or without a code example. Thanks. –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 18:23
    
Looking at Brian's code example and re-reading your answer makes me realize what's going on. I also suspect that I may have sounded "non-appreciative" when I said "Could you elaborate a bit more...?" Since your answer actually explains things I will likely end up selecting it as the answer for this question. Thank you, TomTom. –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 19:24

I tried multiple methods and tested their performance:

The one that reads a single byte is about 50% slower than the other methods. The other methods all return around the same amount of time. You could try creating threads and doing this asynchronously, so while you are waiting for a read you can start processing a previous read. That sounds like a headache to me.

I would go with the one liner: File.ReadLines(filePath).Count(); it performs as well as the other methods I tested.

        private static int countFileLines(string filePath)
        {
            using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader(filePath))
            {
                int i = 0;
                while (r.ReadLine() != null)
                {
                    i++;
                }
                return i;
            }
        }

        private static int countFileLines2(string filePath)
        {
            using (Stream s = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open))
            {
                int i = 0;
                int b;

                b = s.ReadByte();
                while (b >= 0)
                {
                    if (b == 10)
                    {
                        i++;
                    }
                    b = s.ReadByte();
                }
                return i + 1;
            }
        }

        private static int countFileLines3(string filePath)
        {
            using (Stream s = new FileStream(filePath, FileMode.Open))
            {
                int i = 0;
                byte[] b = new byte[bufferSize];
                int n = 0;

                n = s.Read(b, 0, bufferSize);
                while (n > 0)
                {
                    i += countByteLines(b, n);
                    n = s.Read(b, 0, bufferSize);
                }
                return i + 1;
            }
        }

        private static int countByteLines(byte[] b, int n)
        {
            int i = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            {
                if (b[j] == 10)
                {
                    i++;
                }
            }

            return i;
        }

        private static int countFileLines4(string filePath)
        {
            return File.ReadLines(filePath).Count();
        }
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much for taking the time to test this out, Nick! I will run some tests with the examples you give definitively use whichever seems to be more efficient/fast. Thanks, again! –  sergeidave Jan 9 '13 at 22:09
    
Nick, I added some conclusion comments to my original question based on some tests I ran, using most of your methods proposed, in case you wanted to take a look and had more feedback. Thanks, again! –  sergeidave Jan 10 '13 at 16:59
    
Yeah, the file I used was much larger 1GB. –  Nick Bray Jan 10 '13 at 17:14
public static int CountLines(Stream stm)
{
    StreamReader _reader = new StreamReader(stm);
    int c = 0, count = 0;
    while ((c = _reader.Read()) != -1)
    {
        if (c == '\n')
        {
            count++;
        }
    }
    return count;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is likely to have horrible performance, calling a method for each character in the file. –  500 - Internal Server Error Jan 9 '13 at 17:54
    
@500-InternalServerError How would you be able to do any better? I don't see any possible way around it; the best you could do would just be hiding the fact that some API is doing the same thing. It would have a smaller memory footprint than the OP with similar performance, given that each line is rather large. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 17:55
    
@Servy - I would at least use a buffer and read into that a chunk at a time. Another approach would be to use a file mapping but I have yet to try that out from .NET. –  500 - Internal Server Error Jan 9 '13 at 17:56
    
@500-InternalServerError The OS and/or the hard drive will be buffering it internally, you're unlikely to see any benefits out of buffering it again. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 17:57
    
@Servy - I respectfully disagree but grant that the difference may not matter to the OP. –  500 - Internal Server Error Jan 9 '13 at 18:00

The best way to know how to do this fast is to think about the fastest way to do it without using C#.

In assembly there is a CPU level operation that scans memory for a character so in assembly you would do the following

  • Read big part (or all) of the file into memory
  • Execute the SCASB command
  • Repeat as needed

So, in C# you want the compiler to get as close to that as possible.

share|improve this answer

Yes, reading lines like that is the fastest and easiest way in any practical sense.

There are no shortcuts here. Files are not line based, so you have to read every single byte from the file to determine how many lines there are.

As TomTom pointed out, creating the strings is not strictly needed to count the lines, but a vast majority of the time spent will be waiting for the data to be read from the disk. Writing a much more complicated algorithm would perhaps shave off a percent of the execution time, and it would dramatically increase the time for writing and testing the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the change wouldn't be so much in speed, but in the memory footprint. If the lines are large it's the difference between storing each line in memory vs only storing one character at a time in memory (although with buffering, that won't quite be the case, but it means the memory footprint will be almost exactly the size of the buffer, no more). –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 18:41
    
@Servy: Yes, but that has very little impact on the speed. –  Guffa Jan 9 '13 at 19:06
1  
Yep, which is why I opened saying it wouldn't impact the speed. –  Servy Jan 9 '13 at 19:22

There are numerous ways to read a file. Usually, the fastest way is the simplest:

using (StreamReader sr = File.OpenText(fileName))
{
        string s = String.Empty;
        while ((s = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
        {
               //do what you gotta do here
        }
}

This page does a great performance comparison between several different techniques including using BufferedReaders, reading into StringBuilder objects, and into an entire array.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.