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Let's say you have one UIView on your screen and that's it. It's not nested in some other UIView, there are no superviews, it's there by its lonesome.

Then what does it's frame property become?

Definition of frame I found here: "A view's frame is the position of its rectangle in the superview's coordinate system."

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Let's say you have one UIView on your screen and that's it. It's not nested in some other UIView, there are no superviews, it's there by its lonesome.

If a view is visible, it must have a superview. UIWindow is also a UIView (it derives from `UIView), so if you add it to your main window, it is still a subview of a superview.

Now, if you read UIWindow reference:

The UIWindow class defines an object known as a window that manages and coordinates the views an app displays on a device screen.

or here:

In iOS, the window object contains an app’s views and manages their presentation on the device display. The window’s associated screen object represents the specific device display currently in use. If

So, a UIWindow frame is defined in terms of the display coordinate system.

And from UIScreen reference:

A UIScreen object contains the bounding rectangle of the device’s entire screen. When setting up your application’s user interface, you should use the properties of this object to get the recommended frame rectangles for your application’s window.

Generally speaking, what is a view's frame depends on the view and how it is created. When you create a view, you normally use:

[[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:...];

so, the view's frame is the passed CGRect argument, even when the view is not added to any superview.

When you use addSubview to add that view to some other view, then the information you specified when instantiating it is used to determine the position of the added view in the superview's coordinate system.

In other words, a UIView´s frame is just an attribute of the view; this attribute is interpreted as the view´s geometrical position inside of its superview when the view must be displayed.

Furthermore, a view´s frame doesn't change merely by removing it from its superview. It stays the same, in case you add it to a view again. (thanks H2CO3 for the remark)

Hope this helps.

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1  
Worth adding to the end: "I. e. its frame doesn't change merely by removing it from its superview. It stays the same, in case you add it to a view again." – user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 18:39
    
thanks @H2CO3, I have added your comment to my answer. – sergio Jan 9 '13 at 18:41
    
Good job, by the way, +1. – user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 18:44
    
From what you're saying it seems like there is always a UIWindow at the very least. But since it derives from UIView asd well I would also assume that it has the frame information, in which case I'm back to my original question: What would frame be in that case? – user990769 Jan 9 '13 at 19:04
    
I see your point. I added more info at the beginning for my answer. – sergio Jan 9 '13 at 19:15

If you have a UIView on the screen its going to at least be in the main UIWindow of your app. So the UIVIew of your first view controller will be within the main UIWindow's frame.

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Actually, not necessarily. If you alloc-init a view, and you don't add it as a superview, it won't have a superview. – user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 18:44
    
Well yeah if you don't add it to anything but he is saying specifically it is on the screen so I assume it has to be added somewhere. – rooster117 Jan 9 '13 at 18:46
    
@rooster17, well, OP says "there are no superviews, it's there by its lonesome." – user529758 Jan 9 '13 at 18:48
    
Yes well that contradicts the fact that its on the screen. If someone was to ask me a question in that manner I would be assuming they had an understand problem so an explanation of the base window is what matters. If someone says there is a UIView that has been created but not on the screen yet then the other answer is perfect. – rooster117 Jan 9 '13 at 18:51
    
That would be correct, I don't really understand how the UIViews work in combination with what's on the screen. I'm in the middle of trying to sort that all out now. :) It just seems to me that frame is dependent on something that may not necessarily exist, so what would it be in that scenario? (e.g. Not having a superview) – user990769 Jan 9 '13 at 19:05

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