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I imported a csv into R and it considers my variable FERNH a factor; it isn't. I can't figure out why or how to fix it. I have reviewed the values in FERNH and they appear to be correct and in-line with the other 8 variables. Please advise.

str(height)
'data.frame':   512 obs. of  9 variables:
 $ DSH   : int  50 4 35 10 12 0 0 30 0 0 ...
 $ ESH   : int  0 0 0 0 0 30 80 10 8 15 ...
 $ ETH   : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ CANEH : int  0 0 40 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ HERBH : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 5 15 25 10 ...
 $ FERNH : Factor w/ 32 levels "0","10","100",..: 1 1 1 13 1 1 26 1 14 1 ...
 $ C4H   : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 ...
 $ GRASSH: int  40 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
 $ DTH   : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
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There is a character value in there somewhere so R is acting as expected. Look at levels(height$FERNH) to see the offending value. You can set stringsAsFactors=FALSE on your read step or via options, but then the column will be a character rather than integer. –  Justin Jan 9 '13 at 18:43
    
@Justin levels(height$FERNH) is what I needed! Thanks! I unfortunately had an s instead of 5. –  nofunsally Jan 9 '13 at 18:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

@Justin's pinpointed the problem. Rather than trying to find your offending value with levels, though, you could supply colClasses='integer' to read.csv. Then R will raise an error when it encounters the value during reading and report what it is.

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+1. This is the right approach, however I don't think an error will be raised, but rather the offending value will be made NA. –  BondedDust Jan 9 '13 at 18:58
    
hmmm, I get an error from scan. (2.15.2): read.csv(text="1,'a',3", header=FALSE, colClasses='integer') –  Matthew Plourde Jan 9 '13 at 19:00
    
You're right. I thought that as.integer would be applied and would only return a warning. –  BondedDust Jan 9 '13 at 19:15
    
That's what I expected, too. I'm glad it doesn't, though. –  Matthew Plourde Jan 9 '13 at 19:17

There is a character value in there somewhere so R is acting as expected. Look at levels(height$FERNH) to see the offending value. You can set stringsAsFactors=FALSE on your read step or via options, but then the column will be a character rather than integer.

While that may seem annoying at first, it is an excellent data quality check as well as significant memory savings if the character column contains long strings.

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The space savings would depend on the nature of the data. And generally the direction of change would be to increase space requirements when using strings when the degree of duplication is high and the strings are long. Factors require 4 bytes per entry plus the levels attribute. Strings will require the full number of characters. –  BondedDust Jan 9 '13 at 19:04
    
@DWin that is what I meant, just tried to say it in too few words. :) –  Justin Jan 9 '13 at 19:07

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