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How is the Comparable interface is marker interface, even though it defines a compareTo() method? Please explain detail.

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Where did you hear or read this? I've never heard Comparable called a marker interface before. –  Code-Apprentice Jan 9 '13 at 18:59
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Who said it was a marker interface? Serializable is, has no methods. –  Mob Jan 9 '13 at 18:59
    
i dont think its a marker interface, as it has methods declared (well, a method...) –  radai Jan 9 '13 at 18:59
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Nowhere in the javadoc for the class says it's a marker interface :/ –  asermax Jan 9 '13 at 19:01

3 Answers 3

Quoting Wikipedia on Marker interface pattern (emphasis mine):

[...] class implements a marker interface, and methods that interact with instances of that class test for the existence of the interface. Whereas a typical interface specifies functionality (in the form of method declarations) that an implementing class must support, a marker interface need not do so. The mere presence of such an interface indicates specific behavior on the part of the implementing class. Hybrid interfaces, which both act as markers and specify required methods, are possible but may prove confusing if improperly used.

That being said Comparable<T> can be called a marker interface, but it's confusing and I've never heard this before.

I can't imagine a class testing whether some object implements Comparable<T> without actually down-casting and calling compareTo().

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It is not a marker interface. Marker interface in Java for e.g. Serializable, Clonnable and Remote are used to indicate something to compiler or JVM; indicate a flag to compiler.

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A marker interface is just a design pattern. So even if you read around "X is a marker interface" this doesn't really mean anything apart from "X is an interface with no methods declared".

Since Comparable<T> has one method then it is not used as a marker interface.

A marker interface is useful when you want to attach data to a type to be able to use this data in specific situations, this is not the case of Comparable, which is used to provide an effective interface.

I don't even think that the definition of marker interface is used in javadoc to describe empty intefaces such as Serializable (not sure about it though).

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