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While developing the designer keeps expanding the namespace. Where it should simply instantiate Class1, it is expanding the instantiation to Namespace.Class1.

Is there a way of preventing this behavior? Namespace is a multi-dotted default.

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What precisely are you referring to? –  SLaks Jan 9 '13 at 19:20
    
It will probably stop when you import the class / include the class header. –  dmaij Jan 9 '13 at 19:21
    
Everytime i add a control to my form (Designer), it expands the namespace to full reference. It does this for System namespaces as well. Even if the namespace is the root for the project? –  GoldBishop Jan 9 '13 at 21:07

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Your question is not clear enough, what platform/UI do your app use?

If you develop ASP.NET, the control/component is registered using register tag, but the file designer.vb or the designer.cs will still contain full namespace.

If you develop Windows Forms, the control/component will always have full namespace in the designer.vb and designer.cs.

If you develop WPF/Silverlight, the XAML file will directly display only the class name of the control you use, but the generated g.cs or g.vb will display complete/full namespace.

This is the default behavior of Visual Studio designer, whether ASP.NET, WPF/Silverlight, Windows Forms.

There's nothing you can do to change this, unless you created the UI WITHOUT designer support, such as creating a pure Window in WPF or Form in Windows Forms purely by code.

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Well the problem is when it expands the to the full namespace reference, it posts an error in the list. Something to the face Class can not be instantiated cause it cant be found in <namespace>, blah blah blah. Which all the references in the project are correct (included both as a DLL and as imported namespace). Just funny when looking that it does a FQN instantiation vs the lowest common denominator. If it was FQN'd it shouldnt post an error in the list, which is the source of my questions. –  GoldBishop Jan 10 '13 at 13:03
    
Yes, but what kind of app do you develop? –  Eriawan Kusumawardhono Jan 10 '13 at 17:33
    
I flip between Winforms, SL/WPF, WebForms, and DLL development. Pends on the situation at hand and the solution needed. –  GoldBishop Jan 14 '13 at 20:03
    
ok. but as I have described in my answer, the default behavior is always complete namespace in the generated designer code. there's nothing you can do about this. –  Eriawan Kusumawardhono Jan 15 '13 at 5:43
    
well dang...ty for the insight. –  GoldBishop Jan 15 '13 at 14:42

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