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I am new to PHP and learning. I'm trying to pass a value through a url link but it doesn't seem to work.

The link value I am passing is http://www.mysite.com/index.php?id=f

I want to run a js script if ID not F seen below but right now when I run it. It doesn't do anything:

<?php
$ShowDeskTop = $_GET['id'];
if (isset($ShowDeskTop)){
    echo $ShowDeskTop;

    if ($ShowDeskTop != "f"){
       echo "ShowDeskTop Value is not F";
               echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\">";
       echo "if (screen.width<800)";
       echo "{";
       echo "window.location=\"../mobile/index.php\"";
       echo "}";
       echo "</script>";  
    };
};
?>

I know this is easy PHP 101 but I can't figure it out. I have tried everything from w3schools to other sites on Google for the answer and having no luck. Could someone please tell me what I am doing wrong?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
2  
at first glance echo $ShowDesktop is missing ";" –  Lim H. Jan 9 '13 at 19:29
1  
$ShowDeskTop, you are checking it is set before it exists –  Dagon Jan 9 '13 at 19:30
1  
And you should use != to check if it does not match –  Bjørne Malmanger Jan 9 '13 at 19:30
    
Hello Fellas, I have modified my syntax above to your corrections. It now seems to work but what I noticed if I take away ?id=a from index.php it gives me a error (Notice: Undefined index:...on line 11) which is pointing to this: $ShowDeskTop = $_GET['id']; How do I stop this error? Thanks! –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:39
    
@Bejorne Malmanger, I am still learning php but w3schools shows it as a valid comparison operator unless they made a mistake. You can see it here: w3schools.com/php/php_operators.asp x <> y Not equal True if x is not equal to y 5<>8 returns true. So I don't think it matters <> or !=. But thank you again for your help!! –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is never gonna work since you set the variable AFTER checking if it exist.. The most easy way:

<?php
if (isset($_GET['id'])) {
    echo $_GET['id'];

    if ($_GET['id'] != 'f') {
?>
<script type="text/javascript">
    if (screen.width < 800) {
        window.location = "../mobile/index.php";
    }
</script>
<?php
    }
}
?>

I don't think <> is valid in PHP (it is in VB.NET ..) the is not operator is != or !== (strict/loose comparison).

Also you don't have to close if statements with a ;

This:

if (expr) {

}

Is valid and not this:

if (expr) {

};
share|improve this answer
1  
Just an FYI, <> is a valid comparison operator in PHP. Reference. –  Jon Stirling Jan 9 '13 at 19:35
    
From what w3Schools is saying it is: w3schools.com/php/php_operators.asp take a look under comparisons unless they made a mistake. x <> y Not equal True if x is not equal to y 5<>8 returns true –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:45
    
I didn't knew <> is a valid operator.. Sorry :) –  Dillen Meijboom Jan 9 '13 at 19:55

$ShowDeskTop is not the same as $ShowDesktop variables names are case sensitive!

share|improve this answer
    
I correct the case sensitive issues with $ShowDeskTop in the script above along with all the other suggestions. It seems to work as long as I have ?id=something after index.php. But if the url doesn't include that it give me a (Notice: Undefined index:...on line 11) which is pointing to this: $ShowDeskTop = $_GET['id']; How do I stop this error? Thanks! –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:41
1  
@FrankG. First, kudos for actually doing your developing with strict error reporting on. You will find it will improve ability to learn PHP dramatically. Many newbies don't do this and spends hours fiddling around with problem they would have seen in seconds with this on. The problem is that you are referring to $_GET['id'] before verifying that id exists in $_GET. Most of the answers here have corrected that issue for you, including the one you accepted. –  Mike Brant Jan 9 '13 at 19:59

I thought about writing != instead of <>.

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From what w3Schools is saying <> is fine you can see it here: w3schools.com/php/php_operators.asp take a look under comparisons unless they made a mistake. x <> y Not equal True if x is not equal to y 5<>8 returns true –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:47

You have a number of problems including bad variable case (i.e. variables not matching), checking for variables before they exist, etc. You can simply do something like this:

if (!empty($_GET['id'])) { // note I check for $_GET['id'] value here not $ShowDeskTop
    $ShowDeskTop = $_GET['id']; 
    echo $ShowDeskTop; // note I change case here

    if ($ShowDeskTop !== "f"){  // note the use of strict comparison operator here
       echo "YES, the id doesn't = f";
       echo "<script type=\"text/javascript\">";
            echo "if (screen.width<800)";
            echo "{";
            echo "window.location=\"../mobile/index.php\"";
            echo "}";
       echo "</script>";
    } // note the removal of semicolon here it is not needed and is bad coding practice in PHP - this is basically just an empty line of code
} // removed semicolon here as well
share|improve this answer
    
from what w3schools is saying <> is a valid comparison operator. You can see it here: w3schools.com/php/php_operators.asp (x <> y Not equal True if x is not equal to y 5<>8 returns true) now unless they are wrong I just used that instead of != which is really the same. But thank you very much for the help! I figured it out now!! –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:52
1  
@FrankG I used !== for two reasons. First, it is a strict comparison, meaning that both values compared need to be the same type (string, integer, etc.) and have the same value. <> is a loose comparison. Though this wouldn't really make a difference in this case, I find it best to almost always use strict comparisons unless there is a good reason to use loose comparisons. Second !== and != are pretty much the language standard in PHP. –  Mike Brant Jan 9 '13 at 19:56
    
I understand and I figured it was standard. But a few people were saying its wrong and its not wrong it just might not have been the better choice of the three. So I just wanted those who might think or not know that <> is valid operator. It just wasn't the best choice. Again thank you very much for your help and suggestions it only make me a better programmer in the end!! Thanks!! –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 20:06

Fist thing, you need ; at the end of echo $ShowDesktop

And, what does f mean in if ($ShowDeskTop <> "f"){

share|improve this answer
    
F is just a testing value to get the if then working. –  Frank G. Jan 9 '13 at 19:49

use strcmp() instead of <> operator.

Try

if(!strcmp($ShowDeskTop, "f")){
   echo "YES, the id doesn't = f";
}
share|improve this answer
<?php

   $ShowDeskTop = $_GET['id'];     // assign before checking

   if (isset($ShowDeskTop)){

    //echo $ShowDeskTop;             

    if ($ShowDeskTop !== "f"){
       echo "YES, the id doesn't = f";
       echo "<script type='text/javascript'>";
            echo "if (screen.width<800)";
            echo "{";
            echo "window.location.replace('../mobile/index.php');"; // assuming your path is correct
            echo "}";
       echo "</script>";
    }
   }
 ?>
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