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Possible Duplicate:
In Python, how to list all characters matched by POSIX extended regex `[:space:]`?

How can I get a list of all whitespaces in UTF-8 in Python? Including non-breaking space etc. I'm using python 2.7.

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marked as duplicate by Mechanical snail, Martijn Pieters, CoolBeans, Lev Levitsky, ElYusubov Jan 9 '13 at 21:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Use unicodedata? – Mechanical snail Jan 9 '13 at 19:39
    
    
what do you mean by "a list of whitespaces" – mou Jan 9 '13 at 19:47
4  
I think this question should answer yours: stackoverflow.com/questions/8921365/… – chooban Jan 9 '13 at 19:48
1  
You mean the unicode code points, right? UTF-8 is just an encoding. – delnan Jan 9 '13 at 19:49
up vote 7 down vote accepted

unicodedata.category will tell you the category code for any given character; the characters you want have code Zs. There doesn't appear to be any way to extract a list of the characters within a category except by iterating over all of them:

>>> for c in xrange(sys.maxunicode+1):
...     u = unichr(c)
...     if unicodedata.category(u) == 'Zs':
...         sys.stdout.write("U+{:04X} {}\n".format(c, unicodedata.name(u)))
... 
U+0020 SPACE
U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE
U+1680 OGHAM SPACE MARK
U+180E MONGOLIAN VOWEL SEPARATOR
U+2000 EN QUAD
U+2001 EM QUAD
U+2002 EN SPACE
U+2003 EM SPACE
U+2004 THREE-PER-EM SPACE
U+2005 FOUR-PER-EM SPACE
U+2006 SIX-PER-EM SPACE
U+2007 FIGURE SPACE
U+2008 PUNCTUATION SPACE
U+2009 THIN SPACE
U+200A HAIR SPACE
U+202F NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE
U+205F MEDIUM MATHEMATICAL SPACE
U+3000 IDEOGRAPHIC SPACE

You may also want to include categories Zl and Zp, which adds

U+2028 LINE SEPARATOR
U+2029 PARAGRAPH SEPARATOR

And you almost certainly do want to include all of the ASCII control characters that are normally considered whitespace -- for historical reasons (I presume), these are in category Cc.

U+0009 CHARACTER TABULATION  ('\t')
U+000A LINE FEED (LF)        ('\n')
U+000B LINE TABULATION       ('\v')
U+000C FORM FEED (FF)        ('\r')
U+000D CARRIAGE RETURN (CR)  ('\f')

The other 60-odd Cc characters should not be considered whitespace, even if their official name makes it sound like they are whitespace. For instance, U+0085 NEXT LINE is almost never encountered in the wild with its official meaning; it's far more likely to be the result of an erroneous conversion from Windows-1252 to UTF-8 of U+2026 HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS.

A closely-related question is "what does \s match in a Python regular expression?" Again the best available way to answer this question is to iterate over all characters:

>>> s = re.compile(ru"^\s$", re.UNICODE)
>>> for c in range(sys.maxunicode+1):
...   u = unichr(c)
...   if s.match(u):
...      sys.stdout.write("U+{:04X} {}\n".format(
...        c, unicodedata.name(u, "<name missing>")))
U+0009 <name missing>
U+000A <name missing>
U+000B <name missing>
U+000C <name missing>
U+000D <name missing>
U+001C <name missing>
U+001D <name missing>
U+001E <name missing>
U+001F <name missing>
U+0020 SPACE
U+0085 <name missing>
U+00A0 NO-BREAK SPACE
U+1680 OGHAM SPACE MARK
U+2000 EN QUAD
U+2001 EM QUAD
U+2002 EN SPACE
U+2003 EM SPACE
U+2004 THREE-PER-EM SPACE
U+2005 FOUR-PER-EM SPACE
U+2006 SIX-PER-EM SPACE
U+2007 FIGURE SPACE
U+2008 PUNCTUATION SPACE
U+2009 THIN SPACE
U+200A HAIR SPACE
U+2028 LINE SEPARATOR
U+2029 PARAGRAPH SEPARATOR
U+202F NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE
U+205F MEDIUM MATHEMATICAL SPACE
U+3000 IDEOGRAPHIC SPACE

(I don't know why unicodedata.name doesn't know the control characters' names.)

This is all of the Z* characters, all of the Cc characters that are generally agreed to be whitespace, and five extra characters that are not generally agreed to be whitespace, U+001C, U+001D, U+001E, U+001F, and U+0085. Inclusion of the last group is a bug, but a largely harmless one, since using those characters for anything is also a bug.

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Unicode regex can handle the different categories used for whitespace: stackoverflow.com/questions/8921365/… – Mechanical snail Jan 9 '13 at 20:25
    
@Mechanicalsnail Treating U+001C through U+001F as whitespace is, well, I can see why they did it, and it's probably harmless, but it's still wrong. Treating U+0085 as whitespace is just plain wrong for reasons stated above. (IMNSHO the only approach to control characters that makes sense nowadays is to reassign U+0080 through U+009F according to their Windows-1252 definitions -- even when processing some other encoding -- and treat U+0000..U+0008, U+000E..U+001F, and U+007F as indicative of file corruption.) – zwol Jan 9 '13 at 20:26
1  
It's true that NEL is usually an error, but the Unicode standard, §5.8 says, "CR, LF, CRLF, and NEL should be treated the same on input and in interpretation. Only on output is it necessary to distinguish between them.", which suggests they should all be considered whitespace. – Mechanical snail Jan 9 '13 at 20:56
    
The Unicode standard contains much which reflects an idealized view of the world. If you do that in real life you will fail to process people's documents correctly. Note for example how w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/… does not include NEL in its enumeration, and how w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/… specifically requires that a document whose encoding is declared as ISO 8859.1 must be interpreted as if it were Windows-1252 instead. (My position is even more drastic, I admit.) – zwol Jan 9 '13 at 22:57
1  
@Zack: if you encountered NEL in Unicode string then you should treat it as whitespace (at least Perl, Python regex engines do). In practice it is very rare and it might point to incorrectly decoded text. You should fix the decoding process instead of changing the meaning of regexes. – J.F. Sebastian Jan 10 '13 at 17:57

Zs category might not be enough:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys
import unicodedata

import regex # $ pip install regex

for i in xrange(sys.maxunicode + 1):
    u = unichr(i)
    if regex.match(u"[[:space:]]", u):
        try:
            name = unicodedata.name(u)
        except ValueError:
            name = ""
        print("{:9s} {} {}".format(repr(u), unicodedata.category(u), name))

Output

u'\t'     Cc 
u'\n'     Cc 
u'\x0b'   Cc 
u'\x0c'   Cc 
u'\r'     Cc 
u' '      Zs SPACE
u'\x85'   Cc 
u'\xa0'   Zs NO-BREAK SPACE
u'\u1680' Zs OGHAM SPACE MARK
u'\u180e' Zs MONGOLIAN VOWEL SEPARATOR
u'\u2000' Zs EN QUAD
u'\u2001' Zs EM QUAD
u'\u2002' Zs EN SPACE
u'\u2003' Zs EM SPACE
u'\u2004' Zs THREE-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2005' Zs FOUR-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2006' Zs SIX-PER-EM SPACE
u'\u2007' Zs FIGURE SPACE
u'\u2008' Zs PUNCTUATION SPACE
u'\u2009' Zs THIN SPACE
u'\u200a' Zs HAIR SPACE
u'\u2028' Zl LINE SEPARATOR
u'\u2029' Zp PARAGRAPH SEPARATOR
u'\u202f' Zs NARROW NO-BREAK SPACE
u'\u205f' Zs MEDIUM MATHEMATICAL SPACE
u'\u3000' Zs IDEOGRAPHIC SPACE
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The list of offical space characters in the unicode database is defined through the 'Zs' categorie:

http://www.fileformat.info/info/unicode/category/Zs/list.htm

I am not sure if there is a functionality in Python's unicodedata module. I doubt: you can look over all characters and check their category against 'Zs'.

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