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How could you create a method that could flip 2 bits (ranges 00-11 Hence 0-3) in a byte, Randomly!

Example Example

Coin flip one:   111 01 111
Coin flip two:   111 11 111
Coin flip three: 111 01 111
Coin flip four:  111 10 111

What I'm working with

private static void coinFlip(byte theByte)
    {
        Integer mode = new Random().nextInt(3);
        byte value = mode.byteValue();
        byte tmp = value & 255;
            tmp = tmp >> 4;
            tmp = tmp & 3;
           //Point of confusion
           //Now stuff it back in index 5 & 4 ?
    }
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Evolutionary algorithm homework? –  Jivings Jan 9 '13 at 19:43
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on your code:

   private static byte coinFlip(byte theByte)
    {
        Integer mode = new Random().nextInt(3);
        byte value = mode.byteValue();
        return (byte)(theByte ^ (value << 3));
    }

Last line is simply XORING your byte with the two shifted random bits.

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And you my friend, are the winner! –  stackoverflow Jan 9 '13 at 22:42
    
Although I had to shift 4 –  stackoverflow Jan 9 '13 at 22:43
    
To flip the bits in your example / image, << 3 should be correct. (ie, you will leave the lowest 3 bits unchanged) –  Helmuth M. Jan 9 '13 at 22:52
    
You should use int instead of Integer. –  starblue Jan 11 '13 at 7:29
1  
@femtoRgon, you can view XOR as flipping if the second operand is 1 (0^1 = 1, 1^1=0), and not flipping if it is 0 (0^0=0, 1^0=1). Therefore we are flipping those two bits on a random basis. –  Helmuth M. Jan 15 '13 at 0:15
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Filling in using similar methods to what you are using, I think this should work:

private static byte coinFlip(byte theByte)
{
    //Get random value of form 000xx000
    Integer mode = new Random().nextInt(3);
    byte value = mode.byteValue();
    value = value << 3;
    //Mask the result byte, to format xxx00xxx
    byte mask = 231; //0b11100111
    byte maskedByte = theByte & mask;
    //return 000xx000 | xxx00xxx
    return maskedByte | value;
}

As fge said, though, BitSet is the saner way to do it.

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where does maskedByte come from in your example? –  stackoverflow Jan 9 '13 at 20:12
    
Good catch, corrected the declaration of maskedByte. –  femtoRgon Jan 9 '13 at 20:21
    
why do you do this part --> byte mask = (255-3) << 3 ? –  stackoverflow Jan 14 '13 at 16:43
    
Creating a bitmask. Looking at it now, this isn't actually correct, but here is the idea: In binary: (11111111 - 00000011) << 3 = (11111100) << 3 = (but not really) 11100111. Perhaps it would be simpler to just use 11100111 = 231. –  femtoRgon Jan 14 '13 at 16:54
    
Will this preserve the other bits in the byte? –  stackoverflow Jan 14 '13 at 17:23
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If you want to set a bit at index n, use:

b |= 1 << n;

if you want to unset a bit at index n, use:

b &= ~(1 << n);

Or use a BitSet (which has a convenient enough .flip() method).

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flip wont change them randomly. and I need to to have two bits flip and push it back to the same byte –  stackoverflow Jan 9 '13 at 19:58
    
No, but you can select integers randomly ;) –  fge Jan 9 '13 at 19:59
    
Could you point me to an example. I'm not the most familiar with BitSet –  stackoverflow Jan 9 '13 at 20:00
    
Just create a new BitSet(8), that will create a bit set of 8 bits (therefore a byte), all set to 0 to begin with. Then flip into this bitset as you see fit. –  fge Jan 9 '13 at 20:03
    
Alternatively, getting a BitSet with BitSet.valueOf(Byte[]) rather than the no-arg constructor, then modifying the bits in question with BitSet.set(index, value) might be a more intuitive use. –  femtoRgon Jan 9 '13 at 20:18
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