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This is my first time creating a .lib file, I have the following C++ .exe project:

#include<stdio.h>

#pragma comment(lib, "mylib.lib")

int myFunction(void);

void main()
{
    myFunction(); 

} 

and another C project (the .lib project)

   int __cdecl myFunction(void)
   {
   }

I'm compiling the .lib file "mylib.lib" successfully and putting it into the compilation directory of my exe file but I'm receiving the "error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol" error, am I forgetting something?

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Among other things, the return type for main. And is this C or C++? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 20:55
    
You're right I forgot the "void". The first project is C++ while the second is C –  Johnny Pauling Jan 9 '13 at 20:57
    
Have you make the LINK<--(using VS) for the compiler add the lib into the proyect? –  Ricardo Ortega Magaña Jan 9 '13 at 21:00
    
@RicardoOrtegaMagaña That is not relevant. The #pragma given here includes the static lib as a linker dependency. There is no need to specify it in the project settings. Also, the user does not appear to be talking about DLLs. –  paddy Jan 9 '13 at 21:02
    
@JohnnyPauling: Nope; main returns int, not void. Always. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 9 '13 at 21:31
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Normally you provide a header for your lib, and include that in both the lib and the user.

Firstly, you should use the extern keyword on the function declaration. And because you have specified the calling convention __cdecl you should be consistent:

mylib.h

extern int __cdecl myFunction(void);

mylib.cpp

#include "mylib.h"

int __cdecl myFunction(void)
{
    return 42;
}

libuser.cpp

#include <stdio.h>
#include "mylib.h"

#pragma comment(lib, "mylib.lib")

int main(void)
{
    printf( "The answer to the question is %d\n", myFunction() ); 
    return 0;
}

Edit -- name mangling...

I just saw your comment about the projects being C and C++. In this case you have to help the compiler with symbol mangling that occurs. In your header, you do this:

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif

extern int __cdecl myFunction(void);

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
Damn I keep getting "unresolved external symbol myFunction referenced in function main" –  Johnny Pauling Jan 9 '13 at 21:19
    
Please check and double-check your capitalisation, return type and parameter list. It must match everywhere. Make sure you've handled the C++ name mangling I mentioned in my edit. Make sure you have used the extern keyword. And make sure you've copied the correct lib, and that your project is looking in the right place. It may be picking up an old version somewhere else. –  paddy Jan 9 '13 at 21:24
    
I think it's not a name mangling problem anymore because here's dumpbin /symbols output: "13B 00000000 SECT5 notype () External | _myFunction" so the function is exported... still my cpp program can't see it. I've doublechecked every string –  Johnny Pauling Jan 9 '13 at 21:46
    
uhm is that "_" on _myFunction added by dumpbin or what? Could be the problem? –  Johnny Pauling Jan 9 '13 at 22:45
2  
This answer seems good to me but I have something to add: did you pay attention that all your objects are compiled for the same architecture? I mean: if you have a 32bit object, it should be linked with other 32bit objects. You can't link 32 and 64 bit code interchangeably –  Marco A. Jan 10 '13 at 12:58
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