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I have a code file that has some #ifdefs I would like removed in the header file after building a library. My first thought was to do this as a perl script that XCode can run. While I can certainly open the header file and read all content of it into a string in perl, I'm curious as to the best way to do the following

  1. Find any occurrence of #ifdef EXAMPLE

  2. Remove it and anything in between the following #endif

So the example is:

int i;
NSString *someString;
#ifdef EXAMPLE
NSString *exampleString;
#endif
bool done;

and the output would be:

int i;
NSString *someString;
bool done;

Options I'm considering:

  • finding index of every #ifdef EXAMPLE and removing it via substring with the next found #endif
  • Write a regex that can somehow remove these occurences.

Considering I haven't written Perl before (Objective-C is my primary language) I was curious if any XCode or Perl developers had any suggestions on what the best approach would be

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Why do you want to remove the ifdefs? –  Schwern Jan 9 '13 at 21:03
1  
Why not just use the C preprocessor? –  Michael Carman Jan 9 '13 at 21:06
    
@MichaelCarman Why not show him how? –  Schwern Jan 9 '13 at 21:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure why you want to strip out ifdefs, and you can probably use a C pre-processor to do this, but here's how you'd do it in Perl because it means I get to play with the flip-flop operator.

First thing is to craft a sufficient regex to match the ifdefs. IIRC they can be indented and there can be indentation between the # and the word.

#ifdef
#    ifdef
    #ifdef

Not sure if that last one is valid, but I'm going with it anyway.

my $ifdef_re = qr{^\s*#\s*ifdef\b};
my $endif_re = qr{^\s*#\s*endif\b};

If it was just removing text between #ifdef and #endif, Perl has the little used flip flop scalar .. operator.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $ifdef_re = qr{^\s*#\s*ifdef\b};
my $endif_re = qr{^\s*#\s*endif\b};

while(<DATA>) {
    my $in_ifdef = /$ifdef_re/ .. /$endif_re/;

    print if !$in_ifdef;
}

__DATA__
int i;
NSString *someString;
#ifdef EXAMPLE
NSString *exampleString;
#endif
bool done;

But since we need to worry about nested ifdefs, its insufficient. A depth counter takes care of that.

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my $ifdef_re = qr{^\s*#\s*ifdef\b};
my $endif_re = qr{^\s*#\s*endif\b};

my $ifdef_count = 0;
while(<DATA>) {
    $ifdef_count++ if /$ifdef_re/;

    print if $ifdef_count <= 0;

    $ifdef_count-- if /$endif_re/;
}

__DATA__
int i;
NSString *someString;
#ifdef EXAMPLE
NSString *exampleString;
#    ifdef FOO
this should not appear
#    endif
nor should this
#endif
bool done;
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not clear why you are coding for nested #ifdef statements, especially without also catering for #else statements. It's not part of the question. –  Borodin Jan 9 '13 at 22:26
2  
@Borodin Expert advice is a collaborative process. Its not just about answering the question, but addressing their problem. A problem they may not have the knowledge and experience to fully think through or express, or just didn't have the time to come up with a complete example. Its my part to fill in those gaps. Nested #ifdefs are going to come up in any interesting code base. To not address it would be lying by omission. (#else statements don't increase nesting so they can be safely ignored) –  Schwern Jan 9 '13 at 22:52

I love regexes, but for this problem I wouldn't use a regex, I'd just read line by line, keeping track of whether I was inside a ifdef:

my $nesting = 0;
while (<STDIN>)
   {
   $nesting += 1 if /^#ifdef/;
   print $_ unless $nesting;
   $nesting -= 1 if /^#endif/;
   }

If you really want to use a regex, and have read the whole file into the variable $source, I think this will work, if you don't need to worry about nesting:

$source =~ s/^#ifdef.*?^#endif.*?$//gms;

The ^ characters anchor those parts of the expression to the beginning of a line. The $ makes the last part of the match only happen at the end of a line.

The .*? behaves almost like .*, which matches zero or more characters, except that it does minimal matching. So instead of matching all the way to the last #endif, it matches to the first one.

The /gms at the end makes it:

  1. Substitute every occurrence, not just one (that's the g)
  2. Make ^ and $ match at line boundaries, not just string boundaries (the m)
  3. Make . match newlines (the s)

You might want to follow every #ifdef and #endif with \s, to only match if there is whitespace following that string.

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