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Possible Duplicate:
JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}

Is there any applicable reason why one would declare functions with vars instead of just regular function definitions, especially when dealing with closure.

Obviously this probably does not make much sense until i demonstrate, so i shall!

NOTE: I am using require.js to make this point obvious

Example A: How i normally do things

define(function() {

    function foo(x) {
        return x + 42;
    }

    function bar(y) {
        return y + foo(y);
    }

    var MyObject = function(config) {
        // some sweet stuff
    }

    MyObject.prototype = {
        myFun: function(x) {
            return bar(x)
        }
    }

    return MyObject;
})

Example B: Ways i see it

define(function() {

    var foo = function(x) {
        return x + 42;
    }

    var bar = function(y) {
        return y + foo(y);
    }

    var MyObject = function(config) {
        // some sweet stuff
    }

    MyObject.prototype = {
        myFun: function(x) {
            return bar(x)
        }
    }

    return MyObject;
})

I assume there must be some difference between the two, maybe... :)

Thank you for your time and effort!


EDIT: Tried to ask the question in a more sensible way!

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marked as duplicate by Tomasz Nurkiewicz, Darin Dimitrov, chumkiu, Linus Kleen, rlemon Jan 9 '13 at 21:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Perhaps, but mine is more in a closure situation where you would always have it defined first (it could be the same, and if is, sorry!) –  Michael Jan 9 '13 at 21:17
1  
@TomaszNurkiewicz This is a different question - That one asks "what is the difference", this asks "Is there a reason to use one vs. the other" –  Jeff Jan 9 '13 at 21:18
1  
@Jeff: I'd say the difference is the reason :-P –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 9 '13 at 21:20
1  
@RocketHazmat No, the difference isn't the reason, but it may imply the reason. That implication may be non-trivial however. The fact that the reason may be reasoned from the difference makes no difference to the reason for the difference in questions, which is that reasoning is hard. When it comes down to it that's the whole reason SO exists in the first place. –  Jeff Jan 9 '13 at 21:24
3  
@Jeff i am pretty sure my brain just divided by 0 –  Michael Jan 9 '13 at 21:25
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1 Answer

There is not really a gain. The Function Declarations you have in Example A get changed to function expressions and hoisted to the top of the closure so they look the same as what you have defined in your first example once the var declarations in Example B are hoisted.

The two forms you have are explicit assignment of function expressions and function declarations. Function declarations get changed into function expressions and the declaration itself is pulled up the top of the function (hoisting).

Read more here: http://elegantcode.com/2011/03/24/basic-javascript-part-12-function-hoisting/

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1  
I thought functions declared with var don't get hoisted. –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 9 '13 at 21:16
    
As the "possible duplicate" suggests that they do not –  Michael Jan 9 '13 at 21:17
2  
They don't. I just tested it: jsfiddle.net/c7w3s –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 9 '13 at 21:18
    
They do get hoisted. The assignment to the var does not. Your test is trying to invoke a something that is undefined at that point, because the assignment of a function to it doesn't apply until later. –  Joshua Enfield Jan 10 '13 at 21:41
    
See this fiddle for a good test case: jsfiddle.net/LtrP2 –  Joshua Enfield Jan 10 '13 at 21:55
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