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How can I generate a native, non-managed Windows executable using modern development tools and languages (like C#, avoiding C/C++)? Specifically, the executable should not have a .NET framework dependency.

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Java? But why do you want to do that, Windows 7 and 8 comes with .Net framework pre-installed –  Dhawalk Jan 9 '13 at 21:17
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See: stackoverflow.com/questions/953146/… –  Eve Jan 9 '13 at 21:20
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I'm not sure what's wrong with this question. Just because the answer is likely "no", it doesn't make it an ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical question. –  dtb Jan 9 '13 at 21:20
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Delphi (Pascal) is still a popular environment for Windows application development. –  SirDarius Jan 9 '13 at 21:21
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The thing is that we have lots of old pcs at my company running XP. Installing the framework for some of our new apps might not be feasible. We still use VB6 for development. I'd like to upgrade my dev env a little bit –  CarlosBlanco Jan 9 '13 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

If you like C#, which is undoubtedly a modern and great programming language, you might enjoy the D programming language which in many ways resembles C# in its goal as a modern alternative to C++.

And yes, the dmd compiler creates native Windows executables, and the language even has a Garbage Collector for automatic memory management.

If you are looking for an IDE for D, this question: An IDE for D will give you a few options.

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The D language looks promising. Just wondering, can I use visual components and connect to DB's with it? I mean. I won't have to use GTK or QT like in some other languages. –  CarlosBlanco Jan 9 '13 at 21:32
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