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I have five tables. tags, streams, streams_tags, posts, posts_tags. The streams_tags and posts_tags are just join tables for tags, streams, and posts.

I'm wanting to select all the posts from the posts table that contain all of the tags that are associated to a stream via the streams_tags table. For instance, if a stream has the associated tags "cat, dog" then all posts with the associated tags "cat, dog" should be returned. It doesn't matter if the post has more tags other than "cat, dog" just as long as it contains the "cat, dog" tags.

tags: id | name

streams: id | name

streams_tags: id | stream_id | tag_id

posts: id | name

posts_tags: id | post_id | tag_id

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What have you tried? You need to use INNER JOINs to JOIN the tables. Is that what you need help with or is it something more subtle? – Melanie Jan 9 '13 at 21:42
    
@Melanie - I've tried too many things to post here. I don't believe I'm stuck on the joins. Where I'm stuck is being able to determine if a post contains all of the tags that are associated to a stream. – Tony Lisanti Jan 9 '13 at 22:10
    
@Tony: Welcome to Stackoverflow! That's a tricky problem, matching "all" tags, not just "any" tag. But it is possible to do this with standard MySQL syntax. – spencer7593 Jan 10 '13 at 1:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

SQL Fiddle demonstration here


This query should return the specified result set:

SELECT p.id
     , p.name
  FROM posts p
 WHERE NOT EXISTS
       ( SELECT 1
           FROM streams_tags st
          WHERE st.stream_id = 201   /* <-- specified stream_id value */
            AND NOT EXISTS
                ( SELECT 1
                    FROM posts_tags pt
                   WHERE pt.tag_id = st.tag_id
                     AND pt.post_id = p.id
                 )
        )
  • For each row from posts
  • query the streams_tags table to find all tags for a specified stream_id
  • exclude any posts where we find a tag_id "missing" from the posts_tags table (for that post)

NOTE: With this query, a non-existent stream, or stream that does not have any tags (i.e. no rows in streams_tags for a given stream_id) will match every post. (If this behavior is undesirable, the query could be modified to add a predicate so that there must be at least one matching tag.)

To gain an understanding of what this query is doing, it's helpful to omit the outermost query, and take a look at just the inner query. (The id values in the examples below reference values loaded in the SQL Fiddle demo.)

Here's that inner query. We've removed the reference to the p.post_id column, and replaced it with a literal. This query is checking if posts.id = 67 is a "match" (in terms of matching all tags) for streams.id = 201.

  SELECT st.tag_id
    FROM streams_tags st
   WHERE st.stream_id = 201    /* <- specified stream_id */
     AND NOT EXISTS
        ( SELECT 1
            FROM posts_tags pt
           WHERE pt.tag_id = st.tag_id
             AND pt.post_id = 67    /* <- post we want to check for a match */
        )

When we run that query to check posts.id = 67, we get no rows back. That means posts.id 67 matches all the tags for the specified stream_id.

When we run that again, specifying posts.id = 68, we get a row back. The row(s) we get back are the streams_tag.tag_id values that are "missing" from the post_tags.

So, if we run this query for each post_id, and check whether or not this query returns rows, we can know which posts match "all" the streams_tags.tag_id for the specified stream_id. And that's what that outermost query is basically doing... running this query for every post_id.


A totally different approach is to get a "count" of matching tags on a post, and compare that to the count of tags on the stream.

SELECT p.id
     , p.name
     , sc.st_count AS st_count
  FROM ( SELECT stc.stream_id
              , COUNT(DISTINCT stc.tag_id) AS st_count
           FROM streams_tags stc
          WHERE stc.stream_id = 201
          GROUP BY stc.stream_id
       ) sc
 CROSS
  JOIN posts p
  LEFT
  JOIN posts_tags pt
    ON pt.post_id = p.id
  LEFT
  JOIN streams_tags st
    ON st.tag_id = pt.tag_id
   AND st.stream_id = sc.stream_id
 GROUP
    BY p.id
     , p.name
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT st.tag_id) >= sc.st_count

NOTE: to get the count of tags from streams_tags (for a specific stream_id) to be available in the HAVING clause, it's necessary to include that in the SELECT list of the query. (The other alternative is move that subquery down to the HAVING clause, and then repeat the specified stream_id value twice in the query...

SELECT p.id
     , p.name
  FROM posts p
  LEFT
  JOIN posts_tags pt
    ON pt.post_id = p.id
  LEFT
  JOIN streams_tags st
    ON st.tag_id = pt.tag_id
   AND st.stream_id = 201  /* <- specified stream_id */
 GROUP
    BY p.id
     , p.name
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT st.tag_id) >=
       ( SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT stc.tag_id) AS st_count
           FROM streams_tags stc
          WHERE stc.stream_id = 201 /* <- specified stream_id */ 
       )
share|improve this answer
    
Wow that work perfectly. Thanks for the thorough explanation and multiple solutions. I learned a lot. I was really stressing about this one and you saved me so much time and work. This is my first post on StackOverflow and now I'm an even bigger fan of it. Thanks. – Tony Lisanti Jan 10 '13 at 15:45
    
@Tony: Welcome to StackOverflow! FYI - performance of those queries will be reasonable on small sets; but with huge sets (i.e. millions of rows in the posts table), both of those queries may turn into into real resource hogs. Appropriate covering indexes on both the posts_tags and the streams_tags tables will be necessary for optimum performance. – spencer7593 Jan 10 '13 at 15:52
    
Thanks for the heads up. I'll definitely keep that in mind. – Tony Lisanti Jan 10 '13 at 16:06

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