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So today i decided to read something about jquery plugin development after i have seen following examples and templates :

CSS-Tricks.com plugin template Longpress.js

Now, i've got the following questions:

@Css-Tricks:

  • Why does he have a paramter named el and where is that thing ever initialized?
  • Why is he adding a reverse reference to the DOM object?
  • Why isn't he using that var methods = {//...} system assumed by the jQuery documentation?

@longpress

  • Also, why isn't he using the pattern from jquery offical?
  • Why isn't he, i.e his mousewheel() method binding to the plugins namespace?
  • Is that all just bad practice or maybe a better way to do?

Thank you in advance

EDIT:

Down here was said that this one might be too specific. So i try to formulate it otherwise; are there problems or bad advices in the official documentation on plugin development which should be handled in other ways?

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Have you emailed the authors? –  Popnoodles Jan 9 '13 at 21:33
    
Nope, i did this before on other questions and almost never got an answer back, unfortunately. –  Sprottenwels Jan 9 '13 at 21:34
    
ok. This question might get closed for being too isolated or whatever is it they say. –  Popnoodles Jan 9 '13 at 21:36
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I will try to answer as many questions as I can.

The "official" jQuery pattern is only a suggestion. It illustrates best practise and is not definitive. That said, it's so good, I use nothing else. The "supervisor" section (right at the end of the code) is seriously clever.

CSS-Tricks

The worst aspect of this pattern os that it puts members in both the $ and the $.fn namespaces. The former can be avoided, eg with the jQuery "official" pattern.

el is a formal variable passed to $.yourPluginName() from $.fn.yourPluginName(), and represents, in turn, each element in the jQuery selection on which the plugin is invoked.

I can't quite see how the author caters for public methods of the plugin.

LongPress

This is a much better pattern. It puts one member in the $.fn namespace. Everything else is 'private' (held in the outermost closure).

No public methods are needed nor provided.

The mousewheel code is not a plugin as such. It is maybe better classified as an "addon". The mousewheel adds an event type to jQuery, so elements can have mousewheel handlers attached/namespaced/triggered etc. in the same way as 'click', 'mouseover', 'mouseout' etc.

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Why does he have a paramter named el and where is that thing ever initialized?

el is a parameter, it doesn't need to be initialized. It is passed in when the plugin is used. For example, $.yourpluginname($("<div />")[0]) would initialize the plugin with el being an empty div that is not attached to the DOM.

Why is he adding a reverse reference to the DOM object?

The reverse reference is simply storing the current instance on the element so that future calls to the plugin with that element can reference the existing instance rather than creating a new one.

Why isn't he using that var methods = {//...} system assumed by the jQuery documentation?

Be cause we as third party developers are free to develop plugins using whatever structure we want.

Also, why isn't he using the pattern from jquery offical?

See previous answer

Why isn't he, i.e his mousewheel() method binding to the plugins namespace?

possibly bad practice, but ultimately that's up to the plugin developer to decide whether it is necessary or not.

Is that all just bad practice or maybe a better way to do?

Neither, it's just proof of the fact that we as developers can develop jQuery plugins using whatever structure we want.

I prefer developing either under the jQuery UI widget system, or using a structure that can be easily extended/modified so that i don't end up with n different versions of the plugin.js. (a modified version of what's in the jquery documentation)

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Thank you very much. Just for saying, i did not want to moan about his structure, i was just interested whether they got a maybe very clear reason to do so :) –  Sprottenwels Jan 9 '13 at 22:16
    
The longpress.js isn't quite written how i would do it, but it gets the job done. I personally don't like how you can't get to the defaults or any of the setup vars without opening the plugin.js. the CSSTricks way is better, but it still doesn't expose the inner methods so that they can be easily extended. At least it exposes the defaults. –  Kevin B Jan 9 '13 at 22:21
    
As you can see from Beetroot's answer, all of this is very subjective and opinionated, which is why this question has a good chance of being closed. An entire book could be written about this topic ( and probably already has been ) –  Kevin B Jan 9 '13 at 22:23
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I would really suggest this as starting point.

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