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In C++ what happens if you create an object on the stack (within a function) and insert it into a heap-allocated container (which has been passed into the function/exists after the function finishes)?

The stack object has local scope, but the container it has been inserted within, is on the heap and can last after the function (where the insert was made) has returned. Is the stack object still retrievable from the container after the function returns?

void Test( std::vector<MyClass>& myvec )
{
    MyClass m;
    myvec.push_back(m);
}
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3  
myvec also has local scope... –  Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 21:40
2  
public void is not C++. This is pseudo-code... and what is Vector? Please provide its definition. –  Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 21:40
2  
@KerrekSB: Because I read intentions, I don't take every thing I read literally. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 9 '13 at 21:42
2  
@user997112 I've change the parameter to be a reference to std::vector as I think that is what you were intending to ask. Hope that's ok. –  Steve Jan 9 '13 at 21:46
2  
@user997112: The problem is, if it's Vector, rather than std::vector, we don't know what that is. Maybe it does store pointers. Just because the template parameter type was MyClass, that doesn't mean it stores MyClass objects. Its push_back member could take objects in by reference, then take their address and store that in its internal storage. That's what KerrekSB was hinting at with his comment. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 9 '13 at 21:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In this particular case, m will be copy-constructed into a new instance of MyClass, which will be owned by the vector. So a different but equivalent instance of MyClass can be retrieved from the vector, yes.

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1  
How do you know that? We don't know the definition of Vector. –  Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 21:42
    
and is that because I used Vector<Myclass> rather than Vector<*MyClass>? –  user997112 Jan 9 '13 at 21:42
    
@user997112: template <typename T> struct Vector { void push_back(T const & x) { p = &x; } T * p; };?! –  Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 21:43
    
@user997112 If it was a vector of pointers, and you did myvec.push_back(&m) then yes, this would invoke undefined behavior (a very bad thing). –  cdhowie Jan 9 '13 at 21:44
1  
@user997112: But what is this Vector template? Is it something you hacked up? You could have given it any kind of insane behaviour we cannot guess. –  Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 21:45

Base assumption: when you use Vector, you really mean std::vector. The answer could change with a container that's designed enough differently.

As long as you do like you usually should, and store objects (not pointers) in the container, you're all right, because what's stored in the container is normally a copy of the object you pass.

Under the right circumstances, the object in the container can be move constructed from what you pass, but the effect is basically the same -- you end up with an object whose lifetime continues until it's removed from the container (or the container is destroyed, etc.)

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Is the stack object still retrievable from the container after the function returns?

Yes, your myvec.push_back(m); makes a copy of m and a new copy is manged by vector.

However, after your function returns myvec doesn't have m inside because you pass myvec into Test function by value, Test function makes a temporary copy of myvec and copy m into it, after function returns the temporary copy of myvec is released. So you meant to pass myvec to Test function by reference as below:

public void Test(Vector<MyClass>& myvec){
    MyClass m;
    myvec.push_back(m);
}
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As noted by other answers, m is copied into vector. That said, your function receives vector by value too (UPD: it was true for the original code, which was edited since), and it's obviously not what you wanted.

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I did try to edit the code but strangely it doesnt show me the code when i click edit. So the answer all depends whether the vector is passed by reference or value? as well as whether it contains pointers or copies? –  user997112 Jan 9 '13 at 21:45
1  
According to your definition, vector contains copies, not pointers. The problem is that (in the old version of your code) you changed a copy of a vector, so these changes won't be visible outside. –  Anton Kovalenko Jan 9 '13 at 21:48

The code in the question will create a copy of MyClass in the std::vector. The original m will be destructed when the Test method exits.

If we change the vector to store pointers to MyClass we have two possible options.

void Test( std::vector<MyClass*>& myvec )
{
    // Allocates a new MyClass on the heap.
    MyClass* pM = new MyClass();
    myvec.push_back(pM);

    // This variable will be allocated on the stack and cleaned up on method exit
    MyClass dontDoThis;
    myvec.push_back(&dontDoThis);
}

At the end of this method myvec has two elements, myvec[0] and myvec[1].

When a container of pointers is stored then the object must be allocated so that it is valid for the length of time the pointer is in the container. In the example above the pM pointer will be valid after the Test method exits. This means that myvec[0] will be a valid pointer after the method exits.

Initially, a valid pointer to dontDoThis variable will be added to the vector, but when the method exits the destructor of dontDoThis will be called and the memory will probably be used to store other data. The pointer in myvec looks ok, but any attempt to actually use it will cause undefined behaviour. On method exit the pointer in myvec[1] might look valid, but actually it points to junk.

Note that at a later time, when myvec[0] is changed or deleted, it is important to call:

delete myvec[0]

to ensure that the object is cleaned up properly. Otherwise a memory leak will occur.

After explaining what will happen with naked pointers, I strongly recommend you use smart pointers such as std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr

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Is the stack object still retrievable from the container after the function returns?

Only if MyClass has a "gut" copy constructor. (Deep copy or sharing ownedship of other resuorses, etc)

I mean, it could be retrived but it could be in a broked state

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